Pan Borneo Highway development endangers the Heart of Borneo

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Conservation, Deforestation, Development, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Infrastructure, Logging, Mammals, Mining, Poaching, Poverty, Rainforests, Roads, Saving Rainforests, Sustainable Development, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation The construction of the Pan Borneo Highway in the Malaysian state of Sabah could disrupt the connections between wildlife populations and appears to run counter to the state’s conservation commitments, according to a new study.Passages under the highway and the rehabilitation of key forest corridors could lessen the impacts of the road, but the authors of the study caution that these interventions are expensive and may not be effective.They argue that planners should consider canceling certain sections of the road with the greatest potential for damaging the surrounding forest. A planned highway network in the Malaysian state of Sabah on the island of Borneo threatens the forests protected as part of the Heart of Borneo agreement made with Indonesia and Brunei, a new study has found.The goal of the agreement was to ensure the survival of continuous rainforest in central Borneo that houses wildlife populations, helps to mitigate climate change and fosters the island’s unique biology. But the construction and expansion of roads for the Pan Borneo Highway project could carve up the core of this ecosystem, the researchers who wrote the paper say.“We just know that these [roads] are going to have really severe effects in some of the last, sizable intact tracts of forest in Borneo and in the world,” William Laurance, a tropical ecologist at James Cook University in Australia and the study’s senior author, said in an interview.Construction for the Pan Borneo Highway in Sabah. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.The team’s research, published Sept. 18 in the journal PLOS ONE, plotted out the series of new and expanded roadway construction that’s part of the multi-year Pan Borneo Highway project in Sabah. The researchers compared these plans with the locations of intact forests, parks and reserves in the state, and then they modeled the repercussions on surrounding forests.“Some of the planned highways are relatively benign, but several are flat-out dangerous,” Sean Sloan, the study’s lead author and an ecologist at James Cook University, said in a statement. “The worst roads, in southern Sabah, would chop up and isolate Sabah’s forests from the rest of those in Borneo.”In particular, a planned stretch between the towns of Kalabakan and Sapulut near Sabah’s southern border with the Indonesian province of North Kalimantan would slice through the Heart of Borneo conservation area.The cross-border initiative covers some 220,000 square kilometers (85,000 square miles), and since its inception in 2007, Sabah has more than doubled the area of forests protected under state law. But to succeed, the Heart of Borneo requires transnational cooperation, as it spans parts the three countries with territory on the island.Constructing parts of the highway in sensitive areas of Sabah is tantamount to “plunging a dagger into the heart of Borneo’s endangered forests and wildlife,” Laurance said. In the researchers’ view, plans for the Pan Borneo Highway project should incorporate not just the impacts on parts of Sabah, but on the broader — and still relatively intact — ecosystem that the Heart of Borneo was designed to protect.The incursion of roads into previously untouched or lightly used forest often leads to a rise in deforestation, hunting, illegal mining and other damaging effects to the surrounding ecosystem.A Bornean elephant in the Kinabatangan River in central Sabah. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Borneo is home to some of the oldest rainforests on the planet, which have existed for 130 million years. In that time, the island’s unique species have flourished, evolving alongside a unique set of ecological dynamics.Laurance pointed to the mast fruiting of the towering dipterocarp trees that anchor the island’s forest ecosystems. Every few years, bunches of these trees fruit in a synchronized pulse, resulting in a cornucopia of food for bearded pigs (Sus barbatus), sun bears (Helarctos malayanus), orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) and a host of other hungry species. Some animals track these migrations across routes that extend for hundreds of kilometers.Sun bears follow the mast fruiting of dipterocarp trees on the island of Borneo. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.“That is a really important part of the Borneo story,” Laurance told Mongabay. “The migration was absolutely critical to Borneo.”But the construction and expansion of roads throw up potential hurdles to these migrations, as well as the movement of animals like Borneo’s dwarf variety of elephant, that are integral to the biology of the island, he said.Planners have proposed stitching together patches of rehabilitated forest to serve as corridors and building underpasses that would allow animals to move from one side of the road to another without endangering themselves or motorists. But Laurance and his colleagues question how effective they’ll be in maintaining meaningful connections between populations.“These proposed mitigation measures for these highways are very likely to be grossly inadequate,” Laurance said.Bearded pigs historically migrate to take advantage of mast fruiting. Image by Rufus46 via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).Forest rehabilitation and underpass construction are expensive, the researchers note. They calculated that a set of underpasses at eight proposed sites along the highway’s routes could cost $38 million or more, a figure that’s larger than the state’s annual budget for the Heart of Borneo initiative.The team’s analysis also suggests that Sabah’s plans miss crucial corridors that would help secure the links that are vitally important to the health of wildlife populations — if the animals choose to go along with these remedies, that is.“We also know that wildlife are often doggedly uncooperative in using these things,” Laurance said.Whether these strategies are successful also hinges upon the quality of the habitat that the corridors or underpasses stitch together.“When you build a new road you typically get a lot of forest destruction and fires, along with poaching, and that means vulnerable wildlife will largely avoid the area,” Mohammed Alamgir, an ecologist at James Cook and one of the paper’s authors, said in the statement. “Relying on underpasses to reduce road impacts is like trying to treat cancer with a band-aid.”Highway construction cuts through a mangrove in northwestern Sabah. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.The researchers suggest rethinking or canceling the parts of the highway with the most potential for causing damage, especially the Sapulut-Kalabakan section. If the Pan Borneo Highway goes forward there as planned, it’s likely to “cut off the head of the Heart of Borneo,” Laurance said, irreversibly altering one of the world’s critical repositories of biodiversity.“This a very obvious and dramatic existential threat to some of the last surviving intact forests” in Borneo, he said.Banner image of a Bornean orangutan by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonEditor’s note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board.Citation:Sloan, S., Campbell, M. J., Alamgir, M., Lechner, A. M., Engert, J., & Laurance, W. F. (2019). Trans-national conservation and infrastructure development in the Heart of Borneo. PLOS ONE, 14(9), e0221947. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0221947FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Amazon trees may absorb far less carbon than previously thought: study

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer The capacity of the Amazon rainforest to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is predicted to increase with climate change, but now computer modelling suggests that these increases may be far smaller than expected.So far, global photosynthesis rates have risen in line with increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, but whether this pattern will hold true for the Amazon, one of the oldest ecosystems on Earth, is still unclear.Depending on how key nutrient cycles are represented, researchers found that models predict the Amazon carbon sink could be 46 to 52 percent smaller than predicted based on current trends, a finding that has serious implications for carbon sequestration forecasts and future climate change.The researchers plan to test the model predictions against the results from proposed field experiments that will artificially elevate CO2 levels in real sections of the Amazon forest — a study for which the team is currently raising funds. The Amazon’s 30-million-year-old soils were never subjected to ice age glaciers, making most highly weathered and low in nutrients like phosphorus. Photo credit: CIFOR on Visual Hunt / CC BY-NC-NDThe capacity of the Amazon rainforest to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is predicted to increase with climate change, but a computer modelling study published in Nature Geoscience suggests that these increases may be far more modest than expected.Depending on how key nutrient cycles are represented in climate models, the Amazon carbon sink may be half the size predicted based on current trends, the study reports — a finding that has serious implications for the escalating climate crisis.One of the few apparent silver-linings of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels has been a predicted simultaneous boost to plant growth — carbon dioxide is one of the key ingredients that fuels photosynthesis, so adding more if it to the air allows plants to photosynthesize more, and produce increased energy for growth — a process known as “CO2 fertilization.”Higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are also forecasted to help plants use water more efficiently by allowing them to keep the pores in their leaves, known as stomata, closed for longer — a potential help against climate change intensified drought.These effects have caused some scientists to anticipate dramatic increases in crop yield, as well as an expansion in the capacity of trees to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and to mitigate human emissions. But these predictions rely on the assumption that forest growth rates, while enhanced by increased carbon, are not limited by other factors, for example, lack of soil nutrient availability.The phosphorus limitIn fact, scientists have discovered a battle going on in Amazon soils. Phosphorus — an essential plant nutrient leached from rock — is in short supply there. But at the same time, this element is in high demand from plants and microbes, while soil minerals naturally bind with it and lock it away.Amazon soils are rich in clays, which contain iron and aluminium oxides that chemically bind and store phosphorus in the soil , putting it out of reach of living organisms that desperately need the element.“While higher CO2 stimulates forest growth by making it easier for [trees] to take in CO2 … that growth will be constrained, over both short and long time periods, by the availability of the nutrients needed for tree growth, mainly nitrogen and phosphorus,” explained Christopher Neill, an ecosystem ecologist at Woods Hole Research Center in Massachusetts, USA. This phosphorus-imposed growth constraint could have serious repercussions for current estimates of Amazon forest carbon sequestration.A Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment in Wisconsin performed by the US Department of Agriculture, which has demonstrated that elevated carbon dioxide levels increase plant growth in a temperate aspen forest. However, scientists question whether a similar growth enhancement would occur in the tropics where soil nutrients are more limited. Image by Bruce Kimball / USDA.Field testing Amazon forest carbon storage modelsThe United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates that natural processes, such as photosynthesis, currently absorb just under a third of all human GHG emissions. The Amazon rainforest is a major contributor to this ecosystem service and — although there have been hints that its capacity for absorbing carbon has been reduced by climate change and deforestation — a growing Amazon carbon sink is still a key component of models used to forecast warming and evaluate mitigation strategies.To date, global photosynthesis rates have risen in line with increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations — meaning more growth and more carbon storage — but whether this global pattern will continue to hold true for the tropics and particularly the Amazon, one of the oldest ecosystems on Earth, is unclear.“A lot of our climate and ecosystem models that are applied to [predict] what [will be] happening in the future have these assumptions built into them … but since [these carbon storage expectations have] never been tested, it’s really urgent that we have a large-scale experiment in the tropics and the Amazon” to ground truth our sequestration hypotheses, said Katrin Fleischer a post-doctoral researcher at the Technical University of Munich in Germany, who led the current modelling study.Fleischer is part of an international research team preparing to do this field work. They’re setting up a large-scale experiment to measure the actual response of Amazon forest patches to elevated atmospheric CO2 levels. The so-called AmazonFACE project will use free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) to artificially increase CO2 levels around groups of Amazon trees over a period of 15 years, and monitor above- and below-ground processes to get a full picture of how individual trees and whole ecological communities might respond to rising carbon dioxide levels.Prior to starting the experiment, the researchers collected baseline data on tree growth, plant nutrition, leaf development and root growth, as well as soil nutrient cycling of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus at the AmazonFACE site near Manaus, in the Brazilian Amazon. They plugged this data into 14 different climate models that included different elements involved in the soil nutrient cycle, including nitrogen and phosphorus, and looked for varying levels of adaptability in plant responses to increased carbon dioxide for photosynthesis.All the models supported the hypothesis that atmospheric concentration increases of up to 200 parts per million above current levels would have a positive effect on plant growth, however the increases were, on average, smallest in the six models that took account of phosphorus limitations in the calculations. These models predicted that the Amazon would absorb between 46 and 52 percent less carbon compared to models that did not consider phosphorus limitation.“The [computer] study is slightly unusual [and innovative] in that it involved running a range of different ecosystem models in advance of a [field] experiment, to better inform which processes will be most important to measure [during] the [15-year AmazonFACE] experiment,” explained Lucas Cernusak, a plant physiologist at Australia’s James Cook University, who wasn’t part of the modeling study.Researchers measure forest canopy processes from a measurement tower at the AmazonFACE site near Manaus in the Brazilian Amazon. Researchers can collect data on tree growth, leaf development and root growth, as well as soil nutrient cycling of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. Image by Joao M. Rosa, AmazonFACE.The nutrient-limited AmazonThe Amazon rainforest is more than 30 million years old and was never subjected to ice age glaciers, so most of its soils are deep and highly weathered. As a result, phosphorus is severely depleted in most areas. However, phosphorus is required by plants for protein synthesis, cell division, and energy metabolism, making it essential for growth. In addition, many plants produce phosphorus-rich seeds, fruit or pollen, making reproduction another phosphorus-demanding activity.Even though Amazon soils are known to be nutrient poor, you wouldn’t know it to look at the thriving forest. That’s because plants there have evolved myriad compensatory strategies to win the phosphorus battle: growing larger more extensive root networks, releasing sugars that alter soil pH and free phosphorus from grasping clay, and producing enzymes that activate nutrient-cycling microbes or liberate the nutrient directly from the soil or leaf litter.“It’s a very productive forest, but it’s been adapted to really [efficiently] recycle those few nutrients that it has,” said Fleischer.However, these survival strategies have a cost: “Carbon is the currency that plants can use,” to succeed in multiple ways, Fleischer explains. In the Amazon’s case, plants must invest carbon to get sufficient phosphorus in return, but this trade off means that the plants “have less carbon to invest in [producing] wood,” she said.So, higher levels of atmospheric CO2 — a product of human-induced climate change — should theoretically offer plants sufficient carbon to extract phosphorus from the soil while also investing in more woody plant matter. But that’s only assuming there is enough phosphorus available in the soil to extract.In the computer study, models that allowed some flexibility in how plants balance this trade-off, demonstrated a moderate boost to plant growth under elevated atmospheric CO2 levels: The models generated a range of predictions for how much extra carbon would be stored in plant material under high-CO2 conditions, from an increase of just 5 grams per square meter per year all the way up to 140 grams.However, when compared to field records from the 2000s at the Manaus field site, the authors found that plant carbon sequestration increased by just 23 grams per square meter per year, suggesting that the more conservative models may be closest to the truth — at least for this particular patch of forest.Climbing carbon, fixed phosphorus: into the unknown“The key insight from this paper stems from the fact that the model results vary very widely,” said Neill, because each [computer] model approximates the cycling of phosphorous in different ways. This generates hypotheses that can be tested [on the ground] by the AmazonFACE experiment. “It’s a great use of models… to guide [field] experiments that lead to new insights.”“The crucial next step will be to conduct the FACE experiment, which will be the first stand level CO2 manipulation experiment in a hyper-diverse tropical forest, to see if the models are actually on track with reality,” agrees Cernusak. However, FACE experiments are expensive to set up, and AmazonFACE is currently seeking the remaining funding needed to begin the work.“We know so little about this place, how it works, how it evolved over millions of years, which species are where… how do they [interact] as a community? It’s so complex,” said Fleischer. Meanwhile, the historic Amazon forest is being rapidly altered by escalating climate change, along with other human disturbances. “We’re losing it in front of us without really having understood it,” she concluded.Citation:Fleischer, K., Rammig, A., De Kauwe, M. G., Walker, A. P., Domingues, T. F., Fuchslueger, L., … & Haverd, V. (2019). Amazon forest response to CO2 fertilization dependent on plant phosphorus acquisition. Nature Geoscience, 12(9), 736-741.Banner image caption: Scientists don’t know whether growth enhancements seen in temperate climates will also occur in the Amazon rainforest, where plant growth may be severely limited by low phosphorus availability in soils. Image by Ben Sutherland found on Flickr CC by 2.0d.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amazon Conservation, Conservation, Controversial, Environment, Forests, Green, Rainforests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Path not easy for Gilas crew

first_imgJohn Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Three nights later, the Filipinos will host the Taiwanese traveling to Manila for the game at Smart Araneta Coliseum in Cubao with Chinese Taipei likely to be reinforced by Quincy Davis III.Davis III had earlier been ruled out because of an injury, but a Fiba.com report on Tuesday said that the 6-foot-10 naturalized center had recovered well enough and was again part of the Taiwanese’s 24-man pool.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutTeam Philippines will be spearheaded by Andray Blatche and reigning four-time PBA MVP June Mar Fajardo and will go into both games slight favorites before clashing with Australia in February. Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort June Mar Fajardo. Photo from Fiba.comGilas Pilipinas’ first two games in the Fiba Asia World Cup Qualifiers will be a tall order, with the Filipinos facing Japan first in front of what could be hostile territory before playing a full-force Chinese Taipei.The 4,000-seat Kamazawa gymnasium in Tokyo has been sold out, guaranteeing that the Filipinos won’t have the hometown support they usually get when Gilas and Team Nippon slug it out on Nov. 24.ADVERTISEMENT Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Read Next Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC View comments LATEST STORIES Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. PSC Children’s Games draw praise from Unesco officiallast_img read more

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10 months agoNewcastle boss Rafa Benitez hopes for busy transfer market

first_imgNewcastle boss Rafa Benitez hopes for busy transfer marketby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNewcastle United boss Rafa Benitez hopes to be busy during the January market.But he doesn’t expect a bumper transfer budget from owner Mike Ashley.”I am used to wheeling and dealing all my life,” he said. “I don’t think I was breaking the record in transfer windows, never, ever, with any of my teams. “We had to sell players to buy players. I don’t have any problem with that if you do things in time and find the right players. The main thing is to find the right players.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Electronic Monitoring of Persons with Restraining Orders

first_imgStory Highlights The Minister explained that once the Restraining Order is executed against a perpetrator, that person will be fitted with the electronic bracelet, while the victim will be given a transponder. National Security Minister, Hon. Robert Montague, says electronic monitoring is to be introduced for persons who are the subject of Restraining Orders.Mr. Montague informed that his Ministry is in discussion with a supplier to procure the equipment.The Minister explained that once the Restraining Order is executed against a perpetrator, that person will be fitted with the electronic bracelet, while the victim will be given a transponder.“If that person comes within the limit of 100 yards from (the victim), the transponder will go off and beep and it will send off a signal to the (monitoring) centre, which will call the perpetrator and tell him to step back,” he said.Mr. Montague was addressing the recent signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) by his Ministry, the Jamaica Constabulary Force and the University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona campus, to have more police recruits trained by the institution.The same technology will also be used for those persons who are on bail and those on early release from prison.“Up to March this year, some 143 persons who were on bail were also charged for murder while being on bail. We’re going to enter into some discussions with the Ministry of Justice that, for some categories of crimes, the persons on bail should wear an electronic bracelet as a condition of their bail,” he said.The Minister also indicated that some 400 members of the JCF have been trained in domestic-violence prevention.center_img National Security Minister, Hon. Robert Montague, says electronic monitoring is to be introduced for persons who are the subject of Restraining Orders. last_img read more

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Stars Get Arty For Tigers

first_imgThe stars have come out in force to support the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation’s TigerTime campaign to save the tiger in the wild by creating some fabulous original art.The postcard sized masterpieces will form part of the Foundation’s week of Wildlife Art at the Mall Galleries in London which opens to the public from 4 – 8 June.The exciting collection includes work by Joanna Lumley, Hugh Bonneville, Sir Michael Parkinson, David Gower, Elizabeth Emanuel, Alan Titchmarsh, Sandi Toksvig, Nigel Barker, Peter Egan, Jody Craddock, Deborah Meaden, Sarah-Jane Honeywell, Jane Fallon, Lucy Pinder, Jon Richardson, Sir Stirling Moss, Emre Erturk, Slash, Brian May, Simon King, Nick Hendrie, Francis Rossi and Samantha Fox.You can bid for any of the celebrity tigers by emailing your celebrity choice along with your best offer and contact details including phone number to: bids@tigertime.info with the subject heading ‘Stars & Stripes’. All offers must be received by Sunday 9th June.Alternatively, visit the Week of Wildlife Art at the Mall Galleries, London SW1 4-8 June to see all the original celebrity artwork on display and bid for them in the Gallery. Stars & Stripes forms part of a wonderful week of Wildlife Art featuring:Wildlife Artist of the Year in the Main Gallery
The 2013 shortlist for this coveted annual £10,000 prize – with stunning original artwork and sculpture from around the world. All pieces are for sale with profit supporting endangered wildlife.Three Generations of the Shepherd Family in the North Gallery
Original works and limited editions from David Shepherd CBE, original watercolours from Mandy Shepherd and fabulous mixed media originals from Emily Lamb.‘Urban Safari’ by Jeremy Houghton in the Threadneedle Space
Stunning contemporary original work by Jeremy Houghton – one of the official 2012 BT Olympic artists.Opening times and events:Monday 3rd June – Private View and Prize Giving Evening with David Shepherd CBE and special guests – call 01483 272323 for details 
Public Opening Times FREE entry Tues- Sat 10-5pm (4pm Sat) 
FREE painting demos Wed 5, 12-3pm with Hazel Soan 
Sat 8, 10-2pm with Mandy Shepherd and Emily LambView the full catalogue online here.last_img read more

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Thad Matta earns 300th win in Ohio State mens basketball season opener

OSU freshman forward Jae’Sean Tate in action during a game against Marquette on Nov. 18 in Columbus. Credit: Lantern File PhotoOhio State men’s basketball coach Thad Matta notched his 300th win as the Buckeyes defeated Mount St. Mary’s 76-54 in the team’s first game of the season.Matta, who is in his 12th season with the team, became OSU’s all-time winningest coach during last season’s Big Ten tournament. His OSU teams now have a record of 300-94.“I’ve always said that I’m very fortunate to have the opportunity to be here at Ohio State,” Matta said. “It goes back to (Alex Haley’s) old saying, ‘When you see a turtle on the fence post, you know it didn’t get there by itself.’ That’s definitely me on that fence post.”Sophomore forward Jae’Sean Tate said Matta is deserving of his record.“That’s just another stat to add to his résumé, he’s a wonderful coach, he’s a wonderful guy and hopefully we have many to come this year,” Tate said.Tate, who missed the Buckeyes’ exhibition game against Walsh with a sprained ankle, helped lead the Buckeyes to victory with an impressive offensive showing. His 21 points were one shy of tying his career-high, and his two 3-point field goals nearly equaled his season total from his freshman campaign (three). “It definitely boosts my confidence. I’m still not where I want to be, so I have to continue to work, I can’t rest on that,” Tate said.Matta said as a coach it was rewarding to see Tate’s hard work pay off.“Jae’Sean was good. It was so exciting when he let his first three go, to see it go down. I’ve seen that kid, how diligent he’s been in terms of his work ethic and developing that,” Matta said.Two of the more veteran players on the roster, junior forward Marc Loving and sophomore forward Keita Bates-Diop, led the team in minutes with 35 and 38, respectively, but it was freshman center/forward Daniel Giddens who made one of the biggest impacts of the afternoon.The 6-foot-9 Mableton, Georgia, native made his presence known with 11 points in 26 minutes of hard play.“For myself individually, I just have to build on what I did today and just want to make this season a successful one,” Giddens said.Matta said he was impressed with Giddens’ play.“Daniel was everywhere. He was showing his chest, helping, getting back to his man,” Matta said. “The thing I love about Daniel is that effort is never going to be a problem for him. He’s a kid who cares, he is starving for extra work, he’s starving for finding ways to improve his game.” Giddens appeared to be calm on the court, but the freshman said he was “freaking out”  internally.“I’m not going to lie, I was nervous. I’m still nervous. This is new to me,” Giddens said.Other freshmen members of the Scarlet and Gray also made their presences known. Guard JaQuan Lyle put up 12 points, the third-highest of the team, and guard A.J. Harris came off the bench, showing off his publicized speed and energy. Meanwhile, guard Austin Grandstaff nailed a 3-point attempt, his first and only shot of his young career. The Buckeyes started the game strong going into the half with a 42-21 lead and a team field-goal percentage of 56.3 percent. The Mountaineers tried to mount a comeback in the second half, at one point cutting the deficit to 13 points.“I painted the picture at halftime, I said this is what could happen and it did. We got a little bit complacent,” Matta said. “We didn’t have the pace we needed in the second half.”Turnovers were an issue for the Buckeyes throughout the game, something Tate said will get better as the season goes along.“Having such a young team, being the first game I think that played a role in that. With two freshman point guards and so many young guys, we’ll mature as the season goes on,” Tate said.Matta said the turnovers were due to not making the simple play, and there’s still a lot of teaching needed for a young Buckeye team that has games both Tuesday and Friday. “I just told them after the game, ‘You guys want to play in the NBA? Well, you’ve got an NBA schedule this week,’” Matta said. “We’ve got to prepare for Grambling, but we also got to look at what we need to get better at.”The Buckeyes are set to take the court again at the Schottenstein Center on Tuesday at 7 p.m. against Grambling State. read more

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Frontcourt provides relief in Ohio State womens basketballs 9770 win

OSU forward Alexa Hart (22) looks for space around defending Virginia Cavaliers forward Sydney Umeri (44) on Dec. 21 at the Schottenstein Center. Photo Credit: Greg Bartram | USA TODAY SportsThe Ohio State women’s basketball team has relied heavily on the explosiveness of the nation’s top-scoring duo during the 2015-16 season.That wasn’t the case Thursday evening at the Schottenstein Center against the Indiana Hoosiers.Top Buckeye guards, sophomore Kelsey Mitchell and senior Ameryst Alston, were held in check early on in Columbus, prompting the OSU frontcourt to come alive. The extra effort was definitely needed for the No. 5 Buckeyes (11-3, 3-0) to fend off Indiana (9-6, 1-2) at home, 97-70.“They came out ready to play right off the jump,” OSU junior forward Shayla Cooper said. “We had to match their intensity, and once we matched it we actually took it to another level after that.”The Buckeyes have struggled immensely with their perimeter defense this season, ranking dead last amongst Big Ten teams in 3-point defense. A lack of outside pressure has allowed teams to attack OSU with an onslaught of long-range jumpers from the tip.Matters were no better on Wednesday when Indiana opened up the first quarter of play shooting 4-of-6 from beyond the arc.“I think putting more pressure on the ball, not letting them see the open man,” Cooper said of the team’s solution to Indiana’s hot start.Multiple missed layup opportunities also stymied OSU from overcoming Indiana. However, OSU sophomore Alexa Hart and Cooper continued to work the interior, sparking a 10-3 run that knotted the contest at 18 after one quarter of play. Hart registered a double-double on the night, scoring 18 points and collecting 13 rebounds.Despite breaking out of an early shooting slump, the Buckeyes still could not entirely pull away from the Hoosiers. That’s because OSU’s elite scorers Mitchell and Alston continued to be held in check by Indiana, combining to shoot 4-of-18 from the field in the first half.“The way (Indiana) came out, the way they shot the ball, I think that prevented us from doing things that we usually do,” Mitchell said.Nevertheless, OSU’s presence in the post continued to eat away at Indiana. Cooper provided a 14-point first-half spark off the bench, leading a Buckeye frontcourt that outscored the Hoosiers 32-18 in the paint over the first 20 minutes. Cooper finished the night shooting 10-of-16 from the field, tallying 23 points and eight rebounds.“I like the energy and it gives us a different look when she comes in,” OSU coach Kevin McGuff said of moving Cooper to the bench.The Scarlet and Gray brought a 40-35 advantage into halftime and built some early momentum after the break. OSU’s first 3-point conversion two minutes into the second half from Mitchell brought the Buckeyes’ lead to seven and led to an Indiana timeout.Mitchell, who finished with 23 points on the night, led the team with 15 points in the third quarter on a perfect 5-of-5 shooting from the field, opening up a 12-point lead heading into the final quarter.“Sometimes when you’re not sure about yourself and you have a slow start it can wear on you,” McGuff said. “But I do think we have a lot of confidence about how we’re playing.”OSU continued to pull away via not letting up on the Hoosiers, sustaining an aggressive and pesky press on defense. That tenacity brought the team’s turnover margin to a plus-10 mark by the game’s end, and helped the Buckeyes finish with 16 points off of turnovers and 23 offensive rebounds.The Buckeyes will continue their Big Ten schedule with a matchup against Rutgers (10-4) on Sunday. Tipoff is set for 2 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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Solskjaer on mission to restore United pride

first_imgManchester United interim manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer says he wants to restore pride in the “biggest club in the world”.Ahead of his first game in charge, Solskjaer wants the United players to feel proud of their performance once again, reminding them that they are wearing the badge of the “biggest club in the world”.“Attacking football, giving youth a chance and winning. Biggest club in the world, best supporters in the world, best players in the world,” Solskjaer told MUTV.“When I scored on my debut, Eric [Cantona] was there and it was a brilliant feeling. You felt comfortable at Old Trafford and you want the players to feel at home there too.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“It’s about the players being proud of their performance and the fans being proud of their team.“It’s great to be back home. I promise I’ll give everything I’ve got to get this club back to success.”last_img read more

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Meetings for Affected Families of Liquidation

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 3 Nov 2014 – Meetings start today for families impacted by the possible liquidation of British Atlantic Financial Services Ltd. The Premier on Friday announcing that he and the Opposition will sit down to determine what can be done to save the insurances plans which in some cases span two decades. Said to be around $6.2million dollars in the red, BAFSL charges that the Financial Services Commission has been hindering a plan to save the company and its policies. Those meetings tonight are set at the Regent Palms we understand; among those working with the BAFSL customers is Joseph Connolly of PriceWaterHouseCoopers. Beaches puts former Premier on blast about controversial pier Related Items:liquidation, liquidation of British Atlantic Financial Services Ltd, premier rufus ewing Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Row over Grand Turk infrastructure reaches fever pitch in Parliament Bishop says peace & prosperity is everybody’s responsibility at Law Enforcers Church Servicelast_img read more

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