Induction Officer Warns Against Split in Nimba

first_imgDeputy Minister for Planning and Research at the Ministry of Internal Affairs, Teah Nagbe, who recently inducted into office the Nimba County Assistant Superintendent for Development, has sternly warned Nimbaians not to allow their county to be divided.Minister Nagbe stressed in a statement during the induction ceremony that “It will be a big mistake on the part of Nimbaians to allow their county to be split because other counties that did it are not developing as fast as Nimba.”According to Minister Nagbe, there are more large towns and cities in Nimba than in most counties in Liberia, and this is the result of allowing people of diverse backgrounds to congregate in huge numbers.He observed that those counties created from the original nine counties are struggling because they are sparsely populated, making rapid development difficult.Minister Nagbe indicated that the concentration of large populations in Nimba is also beneficial to Liberia because development of those areas accrue to more Liberians.He suggested to the Nimba Legislative Caucus and the county administration to persevere and erect junior high schools in all the major towns to encourage the young people dwelling there to go to school.He said residents will see reason to send their children to school since if the schools are within their communities and students will not have to travel elsewhere to receive higher education.Minister Nagbe cautioned the elders and youths to be careful about those politicians who will only advocate for positions that allow them receive the respect without having any regard for others.“When some are in position, they only want respect to go to them and not others, and as you administer the affairs of the county, be careful not to allow such people to divide you,” he admonished.He urged the Legislative Caucus of Nimba and the county administration to work together for the benefit of the county because the development potential of the county is highly visible.Even though Minister Nagbe made it clear that his warning was not predicated upon any rumor of divide in the county, Nimba County is beginning to see serious tribal division since the Unity Party led government came into existence in 2006.Senator Prince Johnson’s influence in the 2011 election led four Representatives and two Senators, all Gio to the Legislature from Nimba with three Representatives exclusively of the Mano tribe.On that basis, some members of the Mano ethnic group have proposed a division of the county into the Gio, the majority tribe, on one side, and the Manos on the other.For the purpose of maintaining and retaining legislative power in the county, independent sources have discovered that the Gios being in the majority have resolved to establish the “Gio Union” that promotes the political interest of any member of the tribe whether qualified for public office or not.Amid these unfolding events in the county, a Statutory District Superintendent of Nimba, Bartua Bartuah, has opposed the division of the county and called on compatriots to join him in opposing such a division.On local radio stations in Nimba, many residents have registered their distaste for ethnic division in the county and have strongly condemned such a political idea.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Body of drowned Linden teen still to be recovered

first_imgPolice in E Division (Linden-Kwakwani) as of Monday afternoon were still trying to locate the body of 19-year-old Esther Weekes of Lot 14 Burnham Drive, Wismar, Linden, who reportedly drowned in the Demerara River in the vicinity of Burnham Drive and Silvertown, Wismar on Sunday.Nineteen-year-old Esther WeekesThe search party continued to search a section of the river in speedboat, however up to press time, there was still no sign of the teen. Divisional Commander Fazil Karimbaksh said the search was not specified to the area where the teen reportedly drowned but also surrounding areas. However, family members of the teen expressed some disappointment with the way the search was conducted, noted that at least two members of the family were expected to be a part of the search; however they were told that there were not enough life jackets. The family also complained that Police seemed reluctant to conduct the search and also appeared ill-equipped to do so.The Divisional Commander when contacted noted however, that it was not necessary for the family to be a part of the search since the Police were aware of the location. In the case of any sitings, he said undertakers would be summoned, while he was optimistic that the body might be recovered by Tuesday.Meanwhile, Weekes’ family continued to mourn the tragic event. At the time of the incident, Weekes was with her aunt, Cherryann DeJonge and her 11-year-old son. DeJonge on Monday recalled that on the fateful day, the deceased had pestered her for hours to go to the location. She said she was reluctant at first, since one of her sons almost drowned at the same place the day before. She noted that she finally gave in but then decided that she was going to go along to monitor Weekes and her son while they were there, refusing to leaving them alone.“If I could have peeked into the future and get any knowledge that this would have happened,” the woman noted regretfully. Weekes’ great uncle also said that he warned the trio against venturing to the location. DeJonge said she and her niece were very close. She recalled that Weekes and her son were playing when the lad slipped into the water and Weekes extended her hand in an effort to save him, when both went overboard. The woman said their hands “barely touched” when Weekes went under.Revisiting the scene on Monday, the woman told this publication that she was still in disbelief as to how her niece could have drowned since she noted that she did not drift far away from land. The grieving woman said she could still hear the haunting final words of her niece as she struggled to stay afloat. She is adamant that the incident was related to something “spiritual”.“She just kept saying, “Auntie Cherry please save me”,” DeJonge said melancholy. The woman said her son who was able to make it back to land safely, told her afterwards that the water in the section of the river was “circling around” when they went in. Over the years, several people have drowned in the said area of the river. One of the last reported cases was in September 2014, when 14-year-old Omar Mitchel of Half Mile, Wismar, Linden drowned while playing with friends in the vicinity of the old Sawmill. Reports had indicated that he was pushed into the river by one of his friends.last_img read more

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NEAT hopes Environmental film sparks change

first_img[asset|aid=861|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=6cc9e865c22d3d1960bab44a6af57cb7-Sally Emory 2_1_Pub.mp3] The screening will be held at the Whole Wheat and Honey Cafe, tomorrow night at 7. The Northern Environmental Action Team – or NEAT, hopes its film screening tomorrow will bring a change to Fort St. John. The film, titled End of Suburbia, questions whether suburbia is a sustainable living choice for everyone. Executive Director Sally Emory says there are many eco-friendly options for Fort St. John to consider. – Advertisement -[asset|aid=860|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=6cc9e865c22d3d1960bab44a6af57cb7-Sally Emory 1_1_Pub.mp3]She says the movie is about sparking change. It’s about moving individual actions into a community related action. Emory says everyone is invited to attend the free event. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Trees make the garden

first_imgRenovation of the garden began in October. Trees have been pared down to reveal a view of the museum’s roof, and camellias have been added. Items in the garden are of Chinese origin and are symbolic, Erskine said. The garden features the traditional “Three Friends of Winter”: bamboo, which symbolizes flexibility; pine, for longevity; and plum, which blooms early and marks the arrival of spring. A concrete zig-zag bridge in the garden was traditionally believed to ward off evil, which was thought to travel in straight lines. Visually, the black pine softens the edges of the concrete zig-zag bridge, Kitajima said. Kitajima owns a landscaping business in Industry and teaches ikebana. He is currently instructing the staff at La Ca ada Flintridge’s Descanso Gardens in Japanese pruning techniques in the Japanese Gardens and Tea House area. patricia.ho@sgvn.com (626) 578-6300, Ext. 4586 PASADENA – The courtyard garden at the Pacific Asia Museum got two new residents Tuesday morning – a Japanese black pine and a bonsai juniper. As part of the renovation of the garden, master nurseryman Yokou Kitajima planted the trees on the edge of the courtyard’s small pond. The pine is 20 years old and is expected to keep the shape it has now, while growing wider but not much taller, Kitajima said. It was “trained” to grow into its current form with bamboo sticks tied to its branches. “The garden itself is a gallery,” said Georgianna Erskine, a member of the museum’s garden committee. last_img read more

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Donegal scientist to ‘shine a light’ on lung cancer

first_imgDonegal scientist Anne-Marie Baird PhD is hosting an event which aims to shine a light on lung cancer at Glenveagh National Park.The event takes place on Saturday evening at 5:30pm when people are invited to meet at the visitor centre. Talks will take place in the AV room at 6pm, before leaving for the castle at 6:20pm. Refreshments will be served afterwards in The Lagoon, Termon.Anne-Marie says: “The aims of this event are to increase lung cancer awareness, help tackle the stigma associated with the disease and raise funds for research. “In Ireland, lung cancer kills more males than prostate cancer and more females than breast cancer, yet few are aware of this fact or of the symptoms associated with the disease.“For the inaugural event last year – over 130 people attended and in excess of €2,500 euro was raised for the Target Lung Cancer campaign at St. James’s Hospital, Dublin.“Please join us again this year on November 4th to ‘shine a light on lung cancer’.”Attendees are asked to dress appropriately and bring a torch! You can RSVP by following this link:https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/donegal-shines-a-light-on-lung-cancer-tickets-38377712772Donegal scientist to ‘shine a light’ on lung cancer was last modified: November 1st, 2017 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:glenveagh national parklung cancerst james hospitallast_img read more

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Cape bones add new chapter to human history

first_imgThe skeleton found at St Helena Bay is said to come from earliest group of humans to diverge from “Mitochondrial Eve”, our common ancestor. The diagram above shows how female lineage can be traced to Mitochondrial Eve through random selection. The black colour lineage represents matrilineal line descended from mitochondrial DNA of the most recent common ancestor and the other colours are of extinct matrilineal lines. (Image: Wikimedia Commons)Shamin ChibbaJust 150 kilometres north of Cape Town, in the idyllic settlement of St Helena Bay, lived a fisherman. He led a simple life, foraging and hunting for seafood to feed his family. So many of his days were spent in the water, that he developed surfer’s ear, an abnormal bone growth in the ear canal which could decrease hearing and lead to infections.But this was not an ordinary Cape fisherman. This ancient Khoisan man existed 2 330 years ago and the discovery of his skeleton in the coastal village is opening a new chapter in the history of mankind.An international group of researchers recently released their findings based on mitochondrial DNA extracted from the inner canal of a single tooth and ribs from the skeleton. They found he belonged to the earliest group of humans to diverge from “Mitochondrial Eve“, our common ancestor. Before he was unearthed, no genetic data of people who had lived before the arrival of pastoralists in the southern coast of Africa had been recovered.Mitochondrial DNA, otherwise known as maternal DNA, provided the first evidence that we all came from Africa. It helps us map a figurative genetic tree, with all its branches leading to a common Mitochondrial Eve. The closest surviving lineage to this skeleton is the click-speaking foragers largely found in the semi-desert regions of Namibia and Botswana. (Image: Chris Bennet Photography)After noting that the man had osteoarthritis and tooth wear, Prof Alan Morris, a biological anthropologist from the University of Cape Town (UCT), judged him to be in his fifties when he died. Furthermore, when Morris discovered a bony growth in the skeleton’s ear canal, known as surfer’s ear, he realised the man was a “marine forager” who hunted and gathered seafood. “This suggests that he spent some time diving for food in the cold coastal waters, while shells carbon-dated to the same period and found near his grave, confirmed his seafood diet,” Morris said.Vanessa Hayes, a world-renowned expert in African genomics at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney, Australia, said the man existed before pastoralists migrated into the region about 2 000 years ago. “Pastoralists made their way down the coast from Angola, bringing herds of sheep. We could demonstrate that our marine hunter-gatherer carried a different maternal lineage to these early migrants – containing a DNA variant that we have never seen before.” DiscoveryUCT archaeologist Professor Andrew Smith discovered the skeleton in June 2010, just 50 kilometres from the site where 117 000-year-old human footprints, known as Eve’s Footprints, were found in Langebaan 19 years ago. He immediately contacted Hayes.Because of the acidity of the soil, extracting DNA from the skeleton posed a problem, prompting the team to take the samples to paleogeneticist Prof Svante Pääbo at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. The institute is a world-leading laboratory in ancient DNA research, and Pääbo is best known for successfully sequencing a Neanderthal. World renowned genomics professor, Vanessa Hayes, was instrumental in piecing together the lineage of the skeleton found at St Helena Bay. (Image: Garvan Institute of Medical Research)Hayes, who is known for sequencing Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s DNA, said the findings presented evidence that this man and other coastal dwellers came from a lineage most closely related to Mitochondrial Eve and thought to be extinct. “In this study, I believe we may have found an individual from a lineage that broke off early in modern human evolution and remained geographically isolated,” said Hayes. “That would contribute significantly to refining the human reference genome.”The closest surviving lineage to this skeleton is the click-speaking foragers largely found in the semi-desert regions of Namibia and Botswana. Archaeological, historical and genetic evidence shows there once was a broader southerly scattering of click-speaking peoples, including pastoralists who migrated southwards and indigenous marine-foragers. “Because of this, the study gives a baseline against which historic herders at the Cape can now be compared,” said Hayes.The team believes that with further testing of the southern African archaeological record, even more diverse human genomes will be discovered.last_img read more

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Don’t Feed These Daisies

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Pamela SmithDTN Progressive Farmer Crops Technology EditorDECATUR, Ill. (DTN) — Those yellow flowers filling fields across the Midwest aren’t buttercups, baby. They are weeds and consumed in enough quantities, cressleaf groundsel, also called butterweed, can be toxic to livestock.Ohio State University weed specialist Mark Loux said the winter annual weed is being found in fairly high numbers because the weather has held back herbicide treatments this spring.Butterweed is common in no-till corn and soybean fields, and burndown herbicides are typically used to control it early in the spring when the plants are smaller and more susceptible. However, that didn’t happen in many areas this year due to wet weather. It’s also not an option in forage and wheat crops.Native to the United States, butterweed can be found from Texas east to Florida, northward along the Atlantic Coast to Virginia, and west to Nebraska. The plant is poisonous to grazing animals such as cattle, horses, goats, sheep and to humans, Loux said.There are several other weeds that send out yellow flowers this time of year, noted Aaron Hager, University of Illinois weed scientist. “Growers should take the time to look because wild mustard and yellow rocket can sometimes be mistaken for butterweed,” he told DTN.Butterweed is easy to distinguish because it has daisy-like petals with a pincushion-like center. It is a member of the aster family. Leaves alternate on the stem, are deeply divided and lobed. Lobes have round, serrated margins. Stems are hollow and grooved with purplish streaks. Most plants have one stem, but there may be more.Loux said applying herbicides to hay fields isn’t likely to reduce the risk of toxicity in animals. It’s also too late for wheat growers to apply any herbicide to their wheat crops.How much of the weed it takes to harm livestock has not been well documented, Hager said. The plants contain compounds called pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). The PAs are found in the plant throughout the growing season but appear to be at their highest levels when the plant is in the bud to flower stage.“Drying or ensiling the plants during the hay- or straw-making process doesn’t reduce the toxicity of cressleaf groundsel,” Loux said.Loux recommended producers avoid harvesting areas of the field that have high concentrations of cressleaf groundsel (butterweed).Mowing before the weed is in the bud to flower stage will most effectively prevent seed production, but that doesn’t minimize the risk of poisoning. Loux stressed that it is important to prevent including those mowed plants in hay or straw — or to discard bales that contain it. The groundsel is not likely to regrow after the first cutting of hay in the spring. The goal of control strategies should be to prevent it from contaminating the first cutting.It was also noted that using unplanted acres for grazing could be risky if butterweed populations are high.Hager said his research has shown that up to 98% of cressleaf groundsel plants emerge in the fall. “Most of those you see in the field today are already going to seed. If you had a big problem with them or other winter annuals this spring, fall controls are something to consider,” he said.“Butterweed is easy to control with fall or early spring burndown in crop field settings and you’ll be taking care of marestail problems at the same time,” he noted. “We haven’t seen big problems in hayfields, but it’s certainly something to be watching for.”More information on cressleaf groundsel, including how to identify it and manage it, can be found on Ohio State’s weed science website at http://bit.ly/….Find a video about butterweed from Aaron Hager here: http://bit.ly/….Pamela Smith can be reached at Pamela.smith@dtn.comFollow her on Twitter @PamSmithDTN(AG/CZ)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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‘Everyone was eating cucumber sandwiches’: an All Black’s view of Twickenham

first_imgReuse this content Since you’re here… Read more New Zealand rugby union team features When I play golf, my favourite courses are the ones I’ve played well on. It’s the same with rugby: my favourite ground in the world is Loftus Versfeld, because we won a series there. I like grounds where the fans are very close to you, like Newlands or Loftus. I used to love Cardiff Arms. Twickenham’s got some mixed memories for me, but it’s certainly one of the iconic grounds of the world. Share on LinkedIn Read more It’s been an interesting year for the All Blacks. We’ve lost a game, which isn’t normal, but I think the team is in good shape. There is a lot of depth in the squad, and a lot of the young guys have had a lot of Test minutes, which is going to be hugely beneficial at the World Cup next year. You’d like to think the guys will have another win to celebrate at Twickenham this weekend, but with all the new players in the England team it’s hard to know what to expect. As I learned, at Twickenham anything can happen. Share on Messenger England rugby union team Share on Twitter By the time I got back to Twickenham in 1997 the new West Stand had been built, and I felt that changed the atmosphere a bit. I was the touring captain, but an old knee injury had flared up and I had to sit in the stands as we were lucky to get out of there with a 26-26 draw. It was a new experience, and one I didn’t find easy. I’ve had a lot of practice since, and I’ll be covering this year’s game for Sky – I’m a lot more comfortable now with being a spectator. The crowd was very passionate, very loyal, and these days I enjoy the atmosphere at Twickenham. That was a tour I shouldn’t have come on – I’d had an operation on my knee in June or July and we thought it had come right, but I wasn’t fit enough to play, and that was the end of my international career. … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay. Whether we are up close or further away, the Guardian brings our readers a global perspective on the most critical issues of our lifetimes – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. We believe complex stories need context in order for us to truly understand them. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Support The Guardian Share via Email Share on WhatsApp Eddie Jones: ‘New Zealand will always expect to win. It’s in their blood’ My next time at Twickenham was at the 1991 World Cup. By then I’d played 58 times for my country. We had a pretty experienced team, but for most of us including myself it was the first time we’d played against an Englishman. In those days England were quite different to us, in terms of the way they scrummaged, the way they packed the ruck, the line-outs. So we had to do a lot of specific preparations for that game. We came out on top that day, but by the time I came back again in 1993 England were a different prospect.We were a developing team in those days, with a lot of young players. We’d played all right during that tour, and very well against Scotland the week before, but we lacked a bit of experience. You forget how good England were in those days. We weren’t a very large team and they were a lot bigger than us: Martin Johnson, Ben Clarke, Tim Rodber, these guys would tower over us. They were big, experienced, and we didn’t take our opportunities.We lost 15-9, but that match was a real turning point for us. Looking back now, it was a game that showed us what we needed to do if we were going to be competitive going forward. It hurt at the time, for sure. That day just happened to be the reunion of the 1983 and 1973 teams who had beaten the All Blacks also, so the dinner that night was hard work. But we remembered that, and some of the comments we got that night, and going forward the mantra was, “Remember 93”. The next time we played England was in the semi-finals of the 1995 World Cup, and going into that match we spoke a lot about what happened at Twickenham in 1993. We didn’t lose that one. Share on Facebook Twickenham’s got some mixed memories for me, but it’s certainly one of the iconic grounds of the world Share on Pinterest New Zealand’s Twickenham scouting mission goes under Eddie Jones’s radar Topics I remember arriving at Twickenham for the first time, for a game against Barbarians in 1989, and all those childhood memories came rushing back, of growing up and watching the All Blacks in the early hours with a cup of hot chocolate. As a young boy dreaming of one day being an All Black you’d lie in bed at night, dreaming of pulling on the shirt and running out at Twickenham, or Cardiff Arms Park – the great stadiums of the world. To be there, to run out on to that pitch, to see everyone eating their cucumber sandwiches in the car park as we drove in, those are great memories. Sign up for The Breakdown, our weekly rugby union email. Rugby unionlast_img read more

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Otto Marine to Hold Naming Ceremony for ‘Norshore …

first_img My location zoom Otto Marine Limited, an offshore marine company is set to hold a vessel naming ceremony for ‘Norshore Atlantic’ at its Batam Shipyard, Indonesia, on 28 February 2014.The Norshore Atlantic is the first of its kind to be successfully constructed by an Asian yard. It is an efficient and environmental friendly multi-purpose drilling vessel built to the MT6022XL Norwegian design. The highly complex vessel classed by DNV is equipped with dynamic positioning 3 (‘DP3’) capability, and is primarily designed for riserless operation utilizing known and field proven technology. Norshore Atlantic is equipped to perform riserless drilling operations, plugging and abandonment of old wells, well completion work, well intervention and subsea construction work. It has an ROV system installed onboard, and is equipped with a 150T AHC, offshore cranes, and a drilling derrick.The Norshore Atlantic is suitable for work in both shallow and deep water, ranging from 70 to 3000 meters.For its maiden project, the Norshore Atlantic is contracted in Asian waters. Subsequently, it will be engaged by an oil major on a three year program and is expected to work globally. Going forward, the Group’s shipyard will support the growth of our chartering operations by constructing sophisticated offshore support vessels to join the Otto Marine fleet.In addition, the Batam yard will also leverage on opportunities to construct newbuild vessels for the Indonesian cabotage market, at the same time expanding its ship repairs, conversion and fabrication business.“The completion of the Norshore Atlantic is a significant milestone for Otto Marine, and for the offshore support vessel industry in the Asia Pacific region. Through Norshore Atlantic and the recently delivered Go Phoenix, we have demonstrated that our yard is capable of constructing ultra-large, highly sophisticated vessels.The learning curve in the construction of these complex vessels shall be put to good use as the Group embarks on an expansion plan for our chartering services. Our enhanced technical capability will also serve us well in securing third party contracts to construct offshore support vessels, particularly for the buoyant cabotage Indonesian market,” said Mr. Garrick Stanley, Chief Executive Officer. 此页面无法正确加载 Google 地图。您是否拥有此网站?确定 Print  Close Otto Marine, February 27, 2014last_img read more

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