Thurston County 2018 Profile is Ready

first_imgFacebook2Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Thurston Regional Planning CouncilLooking to start a business in Thurston County? Need local data for a grant application? Have a friend who is thinking of moving to the area? The Profile can help. The 2018 edition serves as a comprehensive source of accurate and timely data about Thurston County and its cities, towns, tribes, and other jurisdictions.The Profile includes information about employment, population, housing and real estate, economics and business, local government and education, transportation, the environment and quality of life. Data are available in a variety of formats to meet a range of users’ needs including downloadable tables, interactive charts, and maps. Additionally, users can print one-page “Statistical Profiles” summarizing the latest data available for each city, town, or tribe in Thurston CountyThe Thurston Regional Planning Council has published The Profile annually since 1982. The 2018 edition marks the fifth year The Profile is available exclusively online at www.trpc.org/TheProfile. The web-only format is designed to give desktop and mobile users easy access to information.Reaching a wide audience, The Profile is used regularly by non-profit organizations to complete grant applications, by new and expanding businesses for marketing and demographic research, and is popular among financial institutions, schools, consulting firms, and local government agencies.The Thurston Regional Planning Council is a 22-member intergovernmental board comprised of representatives of municipalities, tribes, educational institutions and other entities. The Council’s mission is to provide visionary leadership on regional plans, policies, and issues in Thurston County.last_img read more

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South Puget Sound Community College A&L Series Presents Winona LaDuke, February…

first_imgFacebook160Tweet0Pin0Submitted by South Puget Sound Community CollegeSouth Puget Sound Community College is proud to present its next 2018-19 Artist & Lecture Series speaker, Winona LaDuke, on February 7, 2019, at 7:30 p.m. in the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts.South Puget Sound Community College is proud to present its next 2018-19 Artist & Lecture Series speaker, Winona LaDuke. Photo courtesy: South Puget Sound Community CollegeLaDuke is a widely-recognize writer, political activist, and outspoken advocate of Native American causes. She writes extensively about human rights, Native land reclamation, environmental justice, and culturally-based sustainability practices. LaDuke will hold a lecture on her causes and organizations, including the Honor the Earth and the White Earth Land Recovery Project, with time to dive deeper through a Q&A session.The evening before her lecture, LaDuke will also be holding a writing workshop with students, including Native high schoolers invited through the FIRE Summit.Tickets to the Feb. 7 lecture are available for $10 or less through the box office at The Washington Center for the Performing Arts.The Artist & Lecture Series brings nationally and internationally recognized artists and speakers who offer diverse and innovative views and performances to the campus and local community, giving audience members the chance to broaden their cultural experience.last_img read more

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Read which former Indian cricketer takes over as Chief Selector!

first_imgImage Courtesy: AFPAdvertisement x6NBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs2g1gaWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Expc( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) q5jhWould you ever consider trying this?😱2uzcmrCan your students do this? 🌚3scg6gRoller skating! Powered by Firework back in 2016, former Indian cricketer MSK Prasad was appointed as the chief National Selector of the Indian men’s senior cricket team by BCCI. Today, BCCI has announced former Team India superstar Sunil Joshi as the new chairman of the national selection panel, replacing Prasad and ending his tenure of four years. Advertisement Image Courtesy: AFPSunil Joshi was suggested for the post of Chief Selector by BCCI’s Cricket Advisory Committee (CAC), consisting of Madan Lal, RP Singh and Sulakshana Naik. CAC also recommended former pace bowler Harvinder Singh to be appointed in the selection committee.“The committee recommended Mr Sunil Joshi for the role of Chairman of the senior men’s selection committee,” BCCI Secretary Jay Shah was quoted in a recent official statement.Advertisement A former talisman of Karnataka cricket team in domestic cricket, Joshi earned 15 Test and 69 ODI caps for Team India between 1996 and 2001. He also played in the first two IPL seasons for Royal Challengers Bangalore. Joshi announced his retirement from all formats of the game in 2012. Harvinder, 42, has appeared for the Men in Blues in three Tests and 16 ODIs from 1997 to 2001.Joshi and Harvinder were chosen out of a five member interview session by the CAC. The two former bowlers were interviewed alongside ex national cricketers Venkatesh Prasad, Rajesh Chauhan and L S Sivaramakrishnan. The five were chosen out of a list of 40 candidates.Advertisement Joshi was chosen from the South zone to replace Prasad, while Harvinder was picked from the central zone, replacing Gagan Khoda in the panel.“We picked them (Joshi and Harvinder) because they were clear in their views,” Ratan Lal told PTI after the interview.Lal also specifically praised Joshi, who has experience in coaching Assam, Hyderabad and Jammu & Kashmir in Ranji, and also worked as a spin bowling consultant of Bangladesh cricket team. The 49 year old was also appointed as a spin bowling coach for Omar and United States cricket teams.However, the other three members of the panels have remained unchanged. Jatain Paranjpe from West zone, Devang Gandhi from East zone and Sarandeep Singh from North zone will retain their selection panel memberships to work alongside the newcomers Joshi and Harvinder, until their terms finish by the end of this year.Also read-What will happen to IPL 2020 if Coronavirus hits India? Advertisementlast_img read more

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The Action fail to gain any ground on Innkeepers, play to 1-1 draw

first_imgThe Action failed to gain any ground on defending league champion Innkeepers as the two front runners played to a 1-1 draw in Leo’s Men’s Open League play Tuesday evening at Lakeside Pitch.The Innkeeper currently sits on top of the standings with a four-point bulge over The Action.Each team has only one loss this season.In the other game on the night Kootenay Co-op got past cellar dwelling Kootenay F.C. 2-1.Co-op sits in third spot in league standings, seven points behind Innkeepers.West Kootenay and Kootenay F.C. are tied for fourth spot, each with four points.In the lone game Friday West Kootenay United meets The Action at 6:45 p.m. at Lakeside.The Action will be missing Byron Rokeby-Thomas for the game Friday. The speedy striker went down with a knee injury and had to be taken to hospital in an ambulance.Tuesday Innkeepers face Kootenay F.C. and West Kootenay United meets Kootenay Co-op.Jackson’s tops Jackson’sJackson’s Hole is the lone undefeated team in the Jackson’s Hole Men’s Master 35-plus league.Jackson’s currently sits on top of league standings, three points ahead of 2010 winner Bia Boro.Real Nelson is in third place followed by Club Inter.Ted Allen’s Jewelry is fifth with Red Dog alone in the basement, winless in six attempts.In action Thursday, Red Dog meets Ted Allen’s, Real Nelson attempts to knock off Jackson’s Hole and Bia Boro battles Club Inter.Dirty leads Finley’sDirty Dozen is undefeated after five games of the Finley’s Ladies Red Soccer League.The five wins puts Dirty Dozen six points in front of second place Red Dog.Finley Jiggers and Lily Whites are tied for third, each with six points. Selkirk Eyecare is fifth with three points.Friday Dirty Dozen look to make it six in a row when the team meets Lily Whites at Lakeside Pitch.Monday, Finley’s Jiggers meet Dirty Dozen while Selkirk Eyecare plays Red Dog.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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Statement from the Stronach Group – October 27, 2019

first_imgBye Bye Beautiful was humanely euthanized after the third race on Sunday, October 27th at Santa Anita Park.  After being pulled up past the ½ mile pole, Bye Bye Beautiful was immediately evaluated by a team of on-track veterinarians, led by Santa Anita Park veterinarian Dr. Dana Stead, and transported in the equine ambulance.  Dr. Stead observed that the filly had suffered a right forelimb lateral condylar fracture with medial sesamoid involvement and, because of the severity of the injury, made the decision to humanely euthanize the horse.Jockey Tiago Pereira was uninjured.As mandated by the California Horse Racing Board, Bye Bye Beautiful will undergo a necropsy at the University of California – Davis’ School of Veterinary Medicine.Bye Bye Beautiful, a two-year-old filly, was making her second start for owners Grenier, Lawless or Lewkowitz, et al.  She finished fourth in her first start on September 13th at Los Alamitos.  The thoughts of the team at The Stronach Group and Santa Anita go out to everyone who cared for the filly, including trainer J. Eric Kruljac and his staff.last_img read more

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Ocean currents spin a web of interconnected fisheries around the world

first_imgConservation, Environment, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Overfishing, Saltwater Fish Article published by Basten Gokkon Most marine catches are made within a given country’s territorial waters, but the fish most likely originated in spawning grounds in another country’s jurisdiction, a new study shows.The modeling of catch, spawning and ocean current data shows that the dispersal of baby fish caught by ocean currents creates an interconnection between global marine fisheries.The finding highlights the need for greater international cooperation in protecting marine ecosystems everywhere, as an estimated $10 billion worth of fish spawn in one country and are caught in another every year. Chances are the locally caught fish you bought down by the wharf was spawned thousands of miles away, migrating on ocean currents, a new study has found.An estimated 90 percent of marine catches are caught within 200 miles, or 320 kilometers, of countries’ shores, but they most likely originated in spawning grounds under the jurisdiction of a different country, according to the study published June 21 in the journal Science.Analyzing data of catch and known spawning grounds of more than 700 fish species, coupled with ocean current data, the paper’s researchers developed a computer model to show where the various species tended to be born and caught.The simulation then showed that the dispersal of baby fish caught by ocean currents created an interconnection between global marine fisheries, the study said.“Now we have a map of how the world’s fisheries are interconnected, and where international cooperation is needed most urgently to conserve a natural resource that hundreds of millions of people rely on,” said co-author Kimberly Oremus, an assistant professor at the University of Delaware’s School of Marine Science and Policy.The global network of flows of fish spawn across international boundaries. The circles represent ocean territories and the lines indicate flows between them. The lines are curved such that the clockwise direction represents flows from source to sink. Image by Nandini Ramesh/University of California, Berkeley.Any two given countries are connected by an average of five degrees of separation, with effects from fishery disruptions — habitat destruction, overfishing, and sea warming — that take place in one country spreading to other nations, both near and possibly on the other side of the world, according to the researchers.This ripple effect could theoretically look like this: If there’s a decline in a species’ spawning population in Indonesian waters, the catch in Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines, Australia, and India’s Andaman and Nicobar Islands will most likely drop.According to the study, the spawning grounds around Japan, Alaska and China are the three regions that currently contribute the most catch to other countries, through their productive spawning populations. Each contributes about 1 million tons to other countries’ catches.Indonesia has the most landed value attributable to other countries, meaning much of its catch originates from the spawning grounds of its neighbors, such as Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea, according to the researchers.“This is something of a double-edged sword,” said lead author Nandini Ramesh, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Berkeley.“On one hand, it implies that mismanagement of a fishery can have negative effects that easily propagate to other countries; on the other hand, it implies that multiple countries can benefit by targeting conservation and/or management efforts in just a few regions.”The finding highlights the need for greater international cooperation in protecting marine ecosystems everywhere — such as large marine ecosystems and marine protected area networks — as an estimated $10 billion worth of fish spawn in one country and are caught in another every year, the authors say. Global fisheries production in 2016 was valued at $130 billion, according to the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization.“This allowed us to talk about how vulnerable a nation is to the management of fisheries in neighboring countries,” Oremus said.A spawning aggregation of Nassau groupers. Image by Alexander Tewfik for WCS.According to the study, the risks to nations’ economies and labor forces are generally highest in the tropics. This is due to a combination of factors, such as there being a large number of small, coastal countries close together in regions with relatively fast ocean currents; economies that rely heavily on marine fisheries; and populations with a high percentage of workers employed in fishing-related jobs.“Our hope is that this study will be a stepping stone for policy makers to study their own regions more closely to determine their interdependencies,” Ramesh said. “This is an important first step. This is not something people have examined before at this scale.”Citation:Ramesh, N., Rising, J. A., & Oremus, K. L. (2019). The small world of global marine fisheries: The cross-boundary consequences of larval dispersal. Science, 364(6446), 1192-1196. doi:10.1126/science.aav3409FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Bid for greater protection of star tortoise, a trafficking mainstay

first_imgThe illegal trafficking of the Indian star tortoise, an IUCN-listed vulnerable species, is thriving despite its trade being restricted under CITES Appendix II and domestic legislation in all three range states.To fight this, range states Sri Lanka and India, along with other countries, have submitted a proposal for the upcoming CITES summit to move the star tortoise from Appendix II to Appendix I.The CITES Secretariat has recommended rejecting the proposal, saying that adding the star tortoise to Appendix I provides no clear benefit for its protection, but proponents say the alarming scale of the trade should be reason enough, and hope to convince the CITES parties of the value of uplisting the tortoise. In March 2019, custom officials open abandoned luggage in the halls of Manila’s international airport. In June, law enforcement agents stop a car to check four trolley bags that passengers had loaded in a rush at a railway station in Kolkata, India. In July, officers arrest a passenger at a railway station in India’s Andhra Pradesh state and inspect his suitcase.In each incident, officials find the same thing: live turtles crawling over and underneath each other, crammed into plastic bags or buckets, hidden between clothes or wrapped in duct tape. Most are no bigger than 10 centimetres (4 inches) in length. Most are Indian star tortoises (Geochelone elegans), the most confiscated species of freshwater tortoise in the world, according to the wildlife trade watchdog TRAFFIC.That could change after this month, at the Conference of the Parties to CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, where a proposal to restrict the trade in the species significantly will be discussed.Proposal for protectionIndian star tortoises  live in grasslands, scrub forests and coastal scrublands. They’re only found in Sri Lanka, southern and eastern India, and a region in northwestern India and adjoining Pakistan.Since 1975, the species has been protected under CITES Appendix II, meaning that its trade requires registration and special permits. Appendix II allows for regulated trade of captive-bred specimens.The star tortoise is classified as vulnerable on the International Union for Conservation’s (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. Illegal collection for the international wildlife trade is by far the biggest threat, followed by increasing habitat loss for farmland. These factors, in combination with long reproductive cycles, make it almost certain that populations in the wild are shrinking.Sri Lanka, which was meant to host the CITES CoP until the event was rescheduled in the wake of the Easter Sunday terrorist attacks, has joined India, Bangladesh and Senegal in proposing to move the star tortoise from Appendix II to Appendix I. Currently, only a few species of freshwater tortoise are in Appendix I, but all others are included with a family listing of Testudinidae spp. in Appendix II.However, the CITES Secretariat has recommended rejecting this proposal. According to the Secretariat, it’s “not clear what additional benefit an Appendix-I listing would provide to the conservation of the species,” which therefore “does not meet the criteria […] for its inclusion in Appendix I.”Indian star tortoises are native to Sri Lanka, India and Pakistan, where they are protected by domestic legislation, but are extensively traded through illegal channels. Image courtesy of Dhruvraj S.Tip of the icebergBut proponents of greater protection say it’s the sheer scale of the star tortoise trade that should compel an uplisting of the species. Recent studies suggest that the volume of the illegal trade has risen sharply, but it’s difficult to ascertain exact numbers.None of the three range states has permitted legal exports of live, wild-collected specimens since 1999, and since no large-scale commercial captive breeding facilities are known, the high volume of pet trade suggests that most specimens that end up in other countries are being illegally exported from Sri Lanka, India and Pakistan.Nearly 5,500 star tortoises have been seized by customs officials and police in Sri Lanka alone since 1997, according to Anslem de Silva, the country’s leading herpetologist.“[This] indicates a high prevalence of smuggling activities,” he told Mongabay. “Researchers here and in India are of the view that the undetected numbers could be 10 times higher. We call for enhanced protection because the species is extremely vulnerable to smuggling and we don’t want to wait till its conservation status changes in order to start taking action to conserve it.”It’s a similar situation in India, according to Sumanth Bindumadhav, wildlife campaign manager for the Humane Society International-India.“The argument that will be made is the sheer volume of trade,” he told Mongabay. “The Indian states of Telangana and Andhra [Pradesh] alone ship out about 55,000 tortoises every year on average, and that’s a solid argument.”These tortoises wind up seized in Malaysia and the Philippines, in Singapore and Bangkok, on Indian trains, from cars, backpacks, and dinghies in the sea between India and Sri Lanka. But these seizures only form the tip of the iceberg. Most smuggling operations likely stay under the radar of customs and law enforcement, or are disguised as captive-bred trade.With new technologies, the scale and ease of illegal trading has grown, with online pet shops openly selling star tortoises in a booming e-commerce trade. Image courtesy of Sumanth Bindumadhav/Humane Society International-India.Express mail and e-commerceSince tortoises are cold-blooded, they can be transported over long distances with minimal precautions, which is why they’re found stuffed into suitcases, boxes, or bags; in other instances, they’re sent off on their own in the luggage compartments of trains and buses, or, as the CITES proposal mentions, even shipped via express mail.Like other conservationists, Bindumadhav said he’s certain the numbers have increased, and that technology has made the trade easier. “When I started doing this work back in 1999, there were few sources to procure these animals,” he said, “but now they are often listed on e-commerce websites, and WhatsApp has made transactions a lot easier.”The most common destinations are East and Southeast Asia, particularly Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia and China, but there might be considerable trade to Europe and the U.S. as well. Some of these countries don’t apply the same stringent regulations that the range states do; Thailand, for example, only regulates the wild-sourced trade.This reality gives added urgency for the proposal to uplist the star tortoise, Bindumadhav said. “A lot of countries are affected by the trade of these animals, especially with EU and U.S.A. being final destination countries in the pet trade,” he said. “Moving this species from Appendix II to I will be a huge boost for its protection in nations that have CITES legislation.”Despite the recommendation of the CITES Secretariat to reject the proposal, it’s the countries that are party to the convention that will ultimately decide on all proposals being made. That means the recommendation “is in no manner the final word,” said Manmohan Singh Negi, the director of wildlife preservation at the Indian Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change.“The biggest impact of moving this species to Appendix I will be a higher level of vigilance in more countries than the current lot,” Bindumadhav said.The proponents say they believe the star tortoise meets the criteria for Appendix I inclusion. But more than that, they say it will send a strong signal to the markets and make a necessary and important statement for the future of star tortoise protection. Article published by dilrukshi Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Banner image:Star tortoises are captured from the wild for the illegal pet trade in large numbers and exported to East Asia, Southeast Asia, Europe and the U.S. Image courtesy of N.A. Naseer. Biodiversity, Cites, Conservation, Environment, Pet Trade last_img read more

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What’s in a name? For Sri Lanka’s newest geckos, a political firestorm

first_imgBiodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Herps, Lizards, New Species, Research, Species Discovery Article published by dilrukshi Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Researchers recently described six new species of geckos, but the discovery has been overshadowed by controversy over their naming.Nationalist figures accuse the researchers of dishonoring historical heroes by naming the geckos after them, with one group even filing a complaint with the police.The scientific community has risen in support of the researchers, pointing out that naming a new species after an individual is universally considered a badge of honor.For their part, the researchers say the focus should be on the new species, which are so rare and their range so restricted that they should be considered critically endangered. COLOMBO — In 2017, herpetologist Sameera Suranjan Karunarathna and his team of researchers undertook a detailed study of lizards in more than 100 locations across Sri Lanka to record the distribution of different species and study their conservation status.What they didn’t bargain for was an ugly spat over the naming of six new species of geckos discovered as part of the study.The issue has become so politically contentious that an ultra-nationalist politician has challenged the naming exercise in parliament, while a group of Buddhist monks is demanding police action be taken against Karunarathna, who is now the target of an online hate campaign. In the process, little attention is being paid to the discovery of the new species or the threats they face.Cnemaspis gotaimbarai is named after another of in honor of another of Dutugamunu’s loyal warriors, Gotaimbara. The species was discovered from the forested hills of Kokagala in Ampara district, a region of immense archaeological and historical significance. Image courtesy of Majintha Madawala.The new research paper, published in the journal Vertebrate Zoology, records the discovery of six new endemic geckos of the genus Cnemaspis from little-known areas in Sri Lanka. It was expected to be welcome news as Sri Lanka petitions for the protection of its endemic lizards at a global wildlife trade summit taking place in Geneva. But instead of celebrating the latest additions to the island’s remarkable list of unique reptiles, the researchers are now dealing with massive hostility.Two of the new geckos, Cnemaspis nandimithrai and C. gotaimbarai, are named after Nandimithra and Gotaimbara, two legendary fighters from the Ten Giant Warriors who served the ancient Sinhala king Dutugamunu, the island’s ruler from 161 to 137 B.C.E.Cnemaspis nandimithrai is named in honor of Nandimithra, a warrior who served King Dutugamunu more than 2,000 years ago. Legend has it that he moved boulders to build a monastery for Buddhist monks. Image courtesy of Nimantha Abeyrathne.The four other geckos are named in honor of lesser-known heroes from the Uwa-Wellassa Rebellion of 1817-1818, when Sri Lankans rose up against the British colonial power: C. kohukumburai (after Kohukumbure Walawwe Rate Rala), C. hitihami (Meegahapitiye Walawwe Hitihami Mudiyanselage Rate Rala), C. butewai (Butewe Rate Rala), and C. kivulegedarai (Kivulegedara Mohottala).“The paper sought to highlight Sri Lanka as a top global hotspot for herpetofauna diversity and a local center of high endemism,” Karunarathna said. “The six additions we have made seek to underpin the fact that ours is an island of reptilian diversity and high endemism.”But some in the country’s political establishment have sought to seize on the issue to burnish their nationalist credentials ahead of elections later this year, by accusing Karunarathna and his team of dishonoring the historical heroes by naming geckos after them. Wimal Weerawansa, a member of parliament, called the naming decision disgraceful, while an ultra-conservative religious group has complained to the police chief in writing.Cnemaspis kohukumburai was discovered in a forest patch in Kadugannawa, in the central district of Kandy. Image courtesy of Majintha Madawala.Show of supportSri Lanka’s scientific community has rallied behind the researchers, pointing out that naming a new species after someone is a common practice meant to honor the latter. In the case of the six new gecko species, they say, naming them after national heroes is an attempt to perpetuate the memory of the latter and educate the public, and not an effort to undermine their legacy.“It is a well-established practice and there is nothing new in naming species after national heroes,” Mendis Wickramasinghe, a herpetologist who has helped describe more than a hundred new species, told Mongabay. “I have named a snake, Aspidura ravanai, to honor King Ravana and a shrub frog, Pseudophilautus puranappu, in the memory of a national hero, Veera Puran Appu. There is no question of attempting to insult their memory.”An isolated hill forest with scattered granite caves in Maragala, in Monaragala district, is the habitat of Cnemaspis hitihami. Image courtesy of Majintha Madawala.Environment lawyer and naturalist Jagath Gunawardane called the naming of a species after an individual the ultimate honor. In 2013, a shrub frog was named in his honor, Pseudophilautus jagathgunawardanai.In an attempt to quell the controversy, Anusha Gokula Fernando, the director of the department of cultural affairs, issued a statement reiterating that the practice of naming new species in honor of prominent personalities is established tradition.Karunarathna had previously named another species of gecko, Cnemaspis godagedarai, after Godagedara Rate Adikaram, a hero of the Uwa-Wellassa Rebellion. In all, he has described eight new gecko and four lizard species, and is in the process of describing a dozen more.The lush, cool and canopied forest of Bambarabotuwa in Ratnapura district is home to Cnemaspis butewei. Image courtesy of Majintha Madawala.Considered critically endangeredThe new Cnesmaspis species — all “point endemic,” or restricted to a very small geographic range — were recorded from cool, wet, spacious granite caves found within rock outcrops in forests largely undisturbed by human activity. These habitats are scattered in geographically isolated forested hills in the historical Uwa-Wellassa region and the central districts of Kandy and Ratnapura.The geckos, small or medium in size, aren’t just restricted in range but also have limited dispersal capabilities and niche specialization, Karunarathna told Mongabay. These factors, along with the relatively low abundance of the species, should qualify them for a conservation status of critically endangered, the researchers say. They also call for further study of Sri Lanka’s isolated forests, especially in the dry and intermediate zones, for both conservation and in-depth research to inform specific management activities.Kivulegedara Rate Rala played a significant role in the Uwa-Wellassa Rebellion of 1817-1818, for which the researchers chose to honor him by naming Cnemaspis kivulegedarai after him. Image courtesy of Sameera Suranjan Karunarathna.The new discoveries bring Sri Lanka’s Cnemaspis species, known as day geckos because they’re active in the daytime, to 32. The total number of known gecko species in the tropical island is 54, 44 of which are found nowhere else on Earth. Most are restricted to the wet zone; 20 species are considered critically endangered, nine endangered, five vulnerable and four are data deficient.Proposals for protection In April, a study highlighted how rare lizards found only in Sri Lanka are winding up in Europe as part of the illegal trade in exotic wildlife. The publication of the study by the wildlife trade monitoring NGO TRAFFIC came ahead of the 18th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). Sri Lanka has put forward a proposal at the summit, currently underway in Geneva, to protect several endemic lizard species from international trade, although they don’t include any day geckos.At home, day geckos face growing pressure on their habitats. Sri Lanka’s forests are shrinking fast, whittled away by human encroachment, primarily for tea and crop farms, and settlements, Karunarathna said.“Other stresses include unplanned infrastructure development and granite mining, forest fires and logging that increase habitat degradation,” he said. “It’s best to fight against these causes than the nomenclature of geckos.”Herpetologist Sameera Suranjan Karunarathna has found himself at the center of a political firestorm after naming six new gecko species after historical figures. Fellow scientists say it’s the ultimate honor to name a species to perpetuate the memory of an individual. Image courtesy of Madhava Botejue.Citation Karunarathna, S. S., Poyarkov, N. A., De Silva, A., Madawala, M., Botejue, M., Gorin, V. A., & Bauer, A. M. (2019). Integrative taxonomy reveals six new species of day geckos of the genus Cnemaspis Strauch, 1887 (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae) from geographically-isolated hill forests in Sri Lanka. Vertebrate Zoology, 69(3), 247-298. doi:10.26049/VZ69-3-2019-02Image of the isolated rocky forest area of Kudumbigala in Ampara district, where Cnemaspis nandimithrai, one of the six new species of day gecko, was recently discovered. Image courtesy of Majintha Madawala.last_img read more

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Audio: Reporter Katie Baker details Buzzfeed’s explosive investigation of WWF

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworecki On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Katie Baker, a reporter for Buzzfeed News investigating allegations of human rights violations and other abuses committed against local indigenous communities by park rangers in Asia and Africa who receive funding from conservation organization WWF.Baker and her colleague Tom Warren have written a series of articles detailing the allegations and WWF’s response. In the latest installment, the journalists report that the director and board of WWF were made aware of the abuses by one of their own internal reports more than a year before Buzzfeed broke the story.In this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, Baker discusses the findings of her investigative reports, what it took to chase this story down, and the impacts she’s seen so far from her reporting. On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Katie Baker, a reporter for Buzzfeed News investigating allegations of human rights violations and other abuses committed against local indigenous communities by park rangers in Asia and Africa who receive funding from conservation organization WWF.Listen here: The investigation by Buzzfeed News revealed that anti-poaching forces funded and trained by WWF have been accused of imprisoning, torturing, and killing indigenous villagers on the fringes of national parks. Baker and her colleague Tom Warren have written a series of articles detailing the allegations and WWF’s response. In the latest installment, the journalists report that the director and board of WWF were made aware of the abuses by one of their own internal reports more than a year before Buzzfeed broke the story.In this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, Baker discusses the findings of her investigative reports, what it took to chase this story down, and the impacts she’s seen so far from her reporting.“No one is saying that [WWF’s rangers] don’t have really difficult jobs… but just because they have a difficult job doesn’t mean they can rape and kill and torture with impunity or arrest people without evidence,” Baker says, adding: “I have not received any hate mail from [WWF employees] telling me I got it wrong.”Here’s this episode’s top news:Violence against indigenous peoples explodes in BrazilStudy finds massive reorganization of life across Earth’s ecosystems$85 million initiative to scale up agroforestry in Africa announcedOnce close to extinction, western South Atlantic humpback population close to full recoveryWould you like to hear how Mongabay grew out of its founder’s childhood adventures in rainforests and a fascination with frogs? Or how a Mongabay editor reacted to meeting one of the world’s last Bornean rhinos? We now offer Insider Content that delivers behind-the-scenes reporting and stories like these from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get exclusive access and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.Chitwan National Park. Photo by Stefanos Nikologianis, licensed under CC BY 2.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Anti-poaching, Conservation, Environment, Human Rights, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Interviews, Journalism, National Parks, Poaching, Podcast, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Rangers last_img read more

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‘A crisis situation’: Extinctions loom as forests are erased in Mozambique

first_imgSmall mountains called “inselbergs” are scattered widely across the central and northern Mozambique landscape. They are crowned by rainforests, which are homes to species that have evolved in isolation for millennia.Inselberg forests are Mozambique’s last inland primary forests. But they’re getting smaller and smaller as humans burn them for agriculture and to flush out game animals, and chop them down for lumber and charcoal.One such inselberg is Mount Nallume, which researchers recently surveyed during a November expedition. While there, they found chameleons that they suspect may be a new speciesHowever, Nallume’s forest is disappearing quickly, with the researchers estimating it may be gone in five to 15 years if deforestation continues at its current rate. They urge the government of Mozambique to do more to protect these “islands in the sky” before they, and the unique animals that live in them, disappear forever. NACOPA, Mozambique — It’s nighttime on Mount Nallume in central Mozambique and the chirping of frenzied crickets fills the thick forest air. Then, toward midnight, another voice joins the cacophony.“I found one!” yells Julian Bayliss to his colleagues Vanessa Muianga and Phil Platts. Muianga is a curator and freshwater expert at the Museum of Natural History in Maputo while Platts and Bayliss are conservation scientists, Platts at the University of York and the IUCN Climate Change Specialist Group, and Bayliss at the African Butterfly Research Institute (ABRI), the Transglobe Expedition Trust and Oxford Brookes University. According to Bayliss, they are the first biologists to set foot on Mount Nallume.They emerge from the underbrush holding a tiny green chameleon just a few inches long. This pygmy chameleon (genus Rhampholeon) holds special significance for the researchers; they suspect it could be a species new to science, one that may live nowhere else in the world except for in this small forest.And soon, Bayliss says, it may live nowhere at all.This chameleon might belong to a species new to science. Photo by Julian Bayliss.Nallume’s forest, home to the chameleon and other wildlife — including more species Bayliss suspects are new to science — is rapidly disappearing as residents from nearby communities chop down its trees for lumber and burn it for food. Bayliss estimates that at its current pace of deforestation, it will be gone in five to 15 years. And it’s not the only one. Dotted throughout the northern half of the country, most of Mozambique’s mountaintop forests are rapidly vanishing as farmers, hunters and loggers hack away their trees for food and money.That’s why Bayliss, Muianga and Platts are here. They are surveying the wildlife of Mount Nallume before it’s too late and the forest and its animals are gone forever.Islands in the skyNallume’s forests are home to native trees that tower 30 meters (100 feet) above the ground, a height that Platts confirms using measurements from a range finder taken at different spots in the forest.Using a hemispherical camera fitted with a fisheye lens that takes 190-degree images of the canopy from many points within the forest, he is also able to deduce that this forest has a lot more moisture than others in the region.“From these measurements we can work out the amount of leaf area in the forests that relate to the potential of the forests to sequester carbon through photosynthesis,” Platts says, adding that the team will estimate the amount of carbon held by Nallume’s trees when they come back in 2020. This expedition is part of a 15 year-research program of the high altitude mountains of northern Mozambique and the researchers’ desire to see them conserved.In addition to the pygmy chameleon discovered during this trip, many other kinds of animals inhabit these forests; hornbills, bush babies, rabbits, antelope, snails, frogs, spiders, pigs, honey bees, crabs, fish, bats, monkeys and leopards can all be seen here. Bayliss also suspects the existence of another endemic butterfly species.The researchers also suspect they uncovered a new species of butterfly. Photo by David Njagi for Mongabay.Next to the campsite a small stream flows, fed by a swamp that stretches deep into the forest. At night droplets of water from the tree canopy can be heard falling onto pitched tents and the forest floor. Around the forest, bogs form a protective moat.When Bayliss and Platts stop at a clear spot to fly a drone and capture aerial images of the forest; blue swallows circle it, perhaps wondering who the noisy intruder might be. Platts reckons the rare birds have migrated from the Congo Basin and have come here because the rainy season is about to begin.Mount Nallume is what geologists call an “inselberg,” which is basically a small rocky mountain. Typically composed of hard granite in Mozambique, inselbergs formed as the softer land around them eroded away through the millennia, exposing more and more of the hard rock outcrops.Rising up from the flatlands, Mount Nallume is crowned with forest. Photo by Phil Platts.Because of their height, inselbergs are able to trap moisture that the surrounding lowlands cannot, making them ideal spots for forest to grow. These forests are oases for animals and plants that wouldn’t be able to survive in the drier, sparser lowlands.Inselbergs are scattered widely across the central and northern Mozambique landscape, often separated by 16 kilometers (10 miles) or more. Their forests used to be connected, back when the region was cooler and wetter and carpeted in trees. But 10,000 years ago or so the region dried out, confining its lush forests and the animals that lived in them to the tops of mountains where they’ve evolved in isolation ever since.Inselbergs and their unique forests and wildlife aren’t limited to Mozambique, but can be found throughout eastern and southern Africa. Researchers have long known of their potential to harbor undiscovered species, with new chameleons, vipers and other animals regularly uncovered during biological surveys.Bayliss himself has around 20 inselberg expeditions under his belt, most recently to Mozambique’s Mount Lico, which lies about 130 kilometers (80 miles) southwest of Nallume. There, he and his team scaled the steep rock cliffs to the forest above where they claim they found several species new to science, including a butterfly.They spent a total of two weeks in 2018 surveying Lico and another inselberg nearby. For this trip to Nallume and another site, they had less than a week, but are planning a longer, more formal expedition later next year.last_img read more

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