421 Indonesians arrested in Malaysian immigration raid

first_img“As many as 1,368 undocumented migrants have been detained and brought for documentation purposes to Kuala Lumpur’s immigration office,” the statement read.Of the arrested migrants, 421 came from Indonesia, 54 from India, six from Pakistan, 790 from Myanmar and 78 from Bangladesh. The rest were from other nations.All of them were questioned and those apprehended were a later declared negative for COVID-19 by the Malaysian Health Ministry.Read also: Migrant Care urges humane treatment, protection for TKI returning amid COVID-19 Topics : The migrants’ offenses allegedly included lacking proper identification, overstaying visas and holding false papers. Under Malaysian immigration laws, the detainees could be deported and banned from reentering Malaysia.Representatives of the Indonesian Embassy in Kuala Lumpur said they were aware of the situation but could not give further information.“The Malaysian authorities have not granted the embassy access to the detainees,” Agung Cahaya Sumirat, the head of the embassy’s information, social and cultural department, told The Jakarta Post on Thursday.With 6,779 confirmed cases and 111 deaths as of Thursday, Malaysia has started to ease its movement control order (MCO) – the country’s term for a lockdown – but has intensified the tracking of people’s movement.The latest two raids have prompted critics from rights groups and the United Nations to speak up about the risks posed by packed detention centers.Last week, the United Nations urged Malaysia to avoid detaining migrants and to release all children and their caregivers, Reuters reported.Read also: Jokowi calls for tight monitoring of COVID-19 clustersYuyun Wahyuningrum, the representative of Indonesia to the ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) raised concerns that the raids had caused fears among migrants in Malaysia, especially those who had finished their contracts but were unable to return home because of the MCO.“These raids have deterred them from coming forward for voluntary testing for COVID-19 because of their fear of detention and deportation,” she said in a statement on Wednesday.While applauding the Malaysian government’s effective measures to flatten the curve, Yuyun reiterated calls from AICHR for ASEAN member states to integrate human rights protections into their efforts to tackle COVID-19, especially for those who were vulnerable and marginalized, such as migrant workers and refugees.center_img Malaysian authorities arrested more than 1,300 undocumented migrants, including 421 Indonesian citizens, in a raid on Monday. Authorities claimed the crackdown was a precautionary measure to contain the spread of COVID-19.It was the second crackdown of the month after a raid on May 2 resulted in the arrest of more than 586 undocumented migrants, The Straits Times reported.The Malaysian Immigration Department said in a statement on Tuesday that authorities had screened 7,551 migrants at the Kuala Lumpur Wholesale Market, where the majority of them worked.last_img read more

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Involving local leaders key to successful COVID-19 education in NTT regency

first_imgMalaka regency in East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) is among those areas that have been relative successful in promoting the government’s “3M” health protocols comprising wearing masks, washing hands with soap and maintaining physical distancing.In a video uploaded on Monday to the YouTube channel of the National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB), BNPB Indonesia, journalist Frans Pati Herin of Kompas said that he had seen people following the health protocols, even in remote areas.During his visit to Manuela village, located 256 kilometers from the NTT capital of Kupang, he encountered a woman in her 60s who wore a mask while she was out walking alone. Frans recounted that the woman said that she always wore a mask whenever she went outside, and told him that she had learned about COVID-19 and the 3M protocols from the local administration and her local church.The head of the Malaka Disaster Mitigation Agency (BPBD Malaka), Gabriel Seran, said the agency had been collaborating with various organizations, including religious communities, to educate the public about the coronavirus since the beginning of the Indonesian outbreak in early March.Gabriel said that the local administration had asked for the agency’s help in curbing the spread of COVID-19 in the regency, which prompted the Malaka BPBD to from its COVID-19 task force. The task force then invited all relevant parties, such as government agencies, religious communities and the military, to contribute to raising public awareness about COVID-19.Read also: Public must help curb virus falsehoods: Task force Editor’s note: This article is part of a public campaign by the COVID-19 task force to raise people’s awareness about the pandemic.Topics : #wearmask #mothermessage #keepyourdistance #avoidcrowd #usesoap #socialdistance #washyourhand #covid19taskforce “The ability to fight COVID-19 is in the hands of the people,” he said, stressing that the task force tried to disseminate correct and accurate information about the virus and the disease at all administrative levels, from villages to districts and on up to the regency level.“We also asked religious leaders [to inform their congregation] at religious forums,” he added.Father Edmundus Sako of the Malaka diaconate said that the Catholic Church was adhering to the government’s health and safety protocols. He added that the church was also working with other institutions to teach the people of Malaka about COVID-19.“As the deacon of and the head of the FKUB in Malaka, I always discuss this matter with [other members],” he said, referring to the Religious Communication Forum.Malaka regency in East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) is among those areas that have been relative successful in promoting the government’s “3M” health protocols. (JP/Swi Handono)Despite the surge in COVID-19 cases around the globe, a survey by Statistics Indonesia (BPS) has found that 17 percent of Indonesians believe it “impossible” that they would contract the disease.“It is a huge number,” national COVID-19 task force chief Doni Monardo said during a virtual event on Friday. He said that given the country’s population of 270 million, this meant that 44.9 million people believed they would not be infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease.Doni stressed that the lack of public awareness was a contributing factor to the continuing spread of the disease in the country.“There are still many people who have yet to receive [complete] information about COVID-19,” he said. (jes)last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Announces More Reductions in Standardized Testing for Pennsylvania Students, Teachers

first_img Education,  Press Release,  Schools That Teach Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf joined parents, teachers and school administrators today to announce more improvements to standardized testing in Pennsylvania. After reducing the number of test days by two days this school year, starting next school year, the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) will be condensed from three weeks to two weeks and shifted to later in the school year, easing stress on students and giving them up to two additional weeks to learn before taking the assessment.The new schedule builds on changes taking effect this school year to remove two sections of the PSSA – one in math and one in English language arts – and reduce questions in the science assessment, which is enabling the Department of Education to condense and move the testing window to later in the year.“We are continuing to respond to the concerns of students, parents and teachers about the amount of classroom time spent of standardized tests,” said Governor Wolf at Colonial Middle School in Montgomery County. “After reducing the classroom time devoted to the PSSA and moving the test window to later in the school year, students and teachers will have more classroom time to focus on learning before taking the test.”This year, the PSSA exams will take place during a three-week testing window which will begin April 9, 2018. Removing two sections of the assessment reduced the amount of classroom time by an average of two days in most schools, enabling the Department to shorten the test window to two weeks and provide school districts the flexibility to begin the assessment as late as April 25 in future years. Since school districts have already established their school calendar the new testing window will begin with the 2018-19 school year.“The changes Governor Wolf and the Department of Education continue to make to the PSSA are a step in the right direction,” said Sally Matthews, seventh grade math teacher at Colonial Middle School. “Moving the assessments later in the year will allow students more time to master grade level curriculum. I appreciate that the feedback provided from educators across the state has been heard, valued, and acted upon.”The Department identified the PSSA changes during discussions with stakeholders for nearly two years when developing the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Consolidated State Plan. The plan is a federal requirement to replace the No Child Left Behind Act.“For years, we have heard from many education stakeholders – especially parents and teachers – about the need to refocus on learning,” said PDE Executive Deputy Secretary David Volkman. “This improved schedule, along with the changes we made to the structure of the tests earlier this year, will address those concerns while maintaining the accuracy of the assessment.”The Department of Education worked with experts and stakeholders to improve the PSSA and ensure the exams maintain rigor. Since standardized tests can interrupt learning and can be disruptive for students, even those in non-tested grades, the Department will continue to identify ways to further reduce those disruptions in coming years.“This is a great compromise between listening to the many parents concerned about the amount of time our children spend taking tests and the need to assess how students and schools are performing,” said Cathy Peduzzi, parent and Colonial School Board member. “The PSSA schedule change will allow our children to have more time to learn in their classrooms as well as in collaborative labs and maker spaces that reflect the realities of today’s world.”Improving standardized testing has been a priority for Governor Wolf. The requirement that students pass an end-of-course tests known as the Keystone Exams has been delayed, and career and technology education students can now demonstrate proficiency and readiness for high school graduation in an alternative pathway, when necessary.Governor Wolf has made clear his strong commitment to education in the commonwealth. Over the past three years Pennsylvania has:Provided historic funding for education to reverse devastating cuts of the past with $800 million for educational programs and to bring teachers back to the classroom.Doubled early childhood education access to provide nearly 8,800 more children access to Pre-K and Head Start programs to get a good start to their education.Increased graduation rates to among the highest in the nation for four-year cohorts from 85.5 percent in 2013-14 to 86.1 percent in 2015-16.Become a leader in STEM education with five nationally-recognized STEM ecosystems and 31 percent more students earning industry-recognized credentials as well as ranking fourth in the number of STEM graduates and in the top 10 of states for STEM jobs.Additionally, the department’s proposed Future Ready PA Index will serve as Pennsylvania’s one-stop location for comprehensive information about school success, and will use a dashboard model to highlight how schools are performing and making progress on multiple indicators.Once implemented, the Future Ready PA Index and ESSA Consolidated State Plan will focus on the individual student to create diverse measures of school success, invest in great teachers, and expand college and career readiness pathways for STEM innovation and capacity. Governor Wolf Announces More Reductions in Standardized Testing for Pennsylvania Students, Teachers December 06, 2017center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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UK regulator announces interim regime for DB superfunds

first_imgCharles CounsellCharles Counsell, chief executive officer of TPR, said: “We have taken bold action now to ensure that the market develops in the best interests of savers, particularly as the impact of the COVID-19 crisis may prompt some sponsoring employers and pension trustees to consider what they can do to meet defined benefit pension promises in the future.”‘High bar’TPR said its regime was tough, setting a “high bar” for superfunds to meet. It also said its guidance was not prescriptive, but “clear and directive”, and for superfunds as well as other new models.Under the superfund model, there is no employer covenant, so capital adequacy is one of the most important areas of the regulator’s interim regime.The PLSA expressed its full support for the guidance, noting protections such as strong capital buffers and a requirement to have a 99% certainty of being funded at levels set by the regulator.The guidance also sets out restrictions on profit-taking and guidance on investments, which the PLSA said were designed to ensure superfunds avoided over-concentrated portfolios and high risk assets.Joe Dabrowski, head of DB, LGPS and standards at the PLSA, said: “The regulator has clearly given a great deal of thought to create an appropriate and affordable supervisory regime, which protects members and the PPF.”“This will lead to considerable creativity in tackling the long-term funding challenges of Britain’s DB pension schemes”Gordon Watchorn, head of corporate consulting at LCPGordon Watchorn, head of corporate consulting at LCP, said publication of the new framework was “an extremely welcome step and will lead to considerable creativity in tackling the long-term funding challenges of Britain’s DB pension schemes”.The regulator has said trustees should only consider using a superfund or a new business model once TPR had completed its assessment, and that the regulator would be providing more information for schemes and employers in the coming months.Two consolidators have been actively marketing themselves, Clara Pensions and the Pensions SuperFund, and have said that they have deals in the pipeline. Clara today said TPR’s guidance “put it firmly on the path to regulatory approval and, once received, its first transactions”.  Rush of deals?Matt Cooper, head of DB consolidation in the pensions team at PwC, said PwC understood there were “significant pipelines”, and that “we could see several billion of pension liabilities transferred in the next 18 months, assuming the economics implied by the regulatory requirements can be supported by providers’ business models”. Adolfo Aponte, managing director at Lincoln Pensions, said the covenant adviser expected TPR’s guidance “to open the flood gates on the sale of the employer covenant links in exchange for a defined pot of capital, which could be transformational in the way that benefits are secured and how they are delivered to members”.“As with any innovation however, there is ample room for unintended consequences and the emerging regulatory regime should ensure members are not left wearing the innovation risk.”The Association of Consulting Actuaries (ACA) said the greater clarity and certainty on new commercial consolidation options would be of particular interest to schemes that could not afford to buy-out with an insurance company in the near future and “where the security of members’ pensions had been put at risk because of the recent COVID-19 business downturn”.However, ACA chair Patrick Bloomfield said the association did not expect a rush of deals to be signed straight away.“We support TPR’s intention to scrutinise each deal individually, checking that it is in the interests of pension scheme members.”Charles Ward, a professional trustee at Dalriada Trustees, said a superfund was likely to be appropriate for a narrow range of schemes.This was because of a ban on transfers from schemes able to buy-out via an insurance company or on course to do so within the foreseeable future, “and the difficulty that weaker employers will have in finding collateral to contribute to their scheme, even if this is less than the buyout deficit”.One of the aspects of the regime noted by experts is that it would not allow consolidators to extract profits in the first three years unless schemes were wound-up.Lesley Carline, president of the Pensions Management Institute, expressed concern that TPR might be creating a regulatory culture disincentivising the creation of consolidators.“Consolidators should be able to remunerate investors without undue regulatory restriction if the superfund concept is to succeed,” she said. “We believe this aspect of today’s announcement requires further clarification.“Apart from this, we are excited that scheme consolidation can finally proceed and see this as a positive development for the members of legacy DB schemes.”Superfunds à la TPR guidanceAccording to TPR, a superfund is a model that allows for the severance of an employer’s liability towards a DB scheme where one of the following conditions applies: The scheme employer is replaced by a special purpose vehicle employer. “This is, to all intents and purposes, a shell employer and is usually put in place to preserve the scheme’s PPF eligibility,” said TPRThe liability of the employer to fund the scheme’s liabilities is replaced by an employer backed with a capital injection to a capital buffer The replacement employer backed by a capital buffer will usually support a consolidator scheme, with important features such as:a bulk transfer of a ceding scheme’s liabilities to a consolidator scheme, which is prepared to accept the liabilities of a number of schemes from unconnected ceding employersits own governance and administration (these functions may be in-house, or outsourced)(usually) one trustee board “I look forward to learning from the experiences from the interim regime, which will provide valuable insights as we develop and finalise our plans for a longer term legislative solution.”Superfunds, which allow for the severance of an employer’s liability towards a DB scheme, were a recommendation of a Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association (PLSA) taskforce and the subject of consultation by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) in 2018.TPR published a first set of guidance in this area that year, but there has been what former pensions minister Steve Webb described as a “regulatory stalemate” on the issue of DB consolidators since then, the main stumbling block being concerns about unfair competition for the insurance industry.The effects of the coronavirus have added to anticipation in the pension industry of a greater regulatory clarity being provided about DB consolidators.  To read the digital edition of IPE’s latest magazine click here.center_img The UK pensions regulator has today set out guidance for how emerging so-called defined benefit (DB) “superfunds” should run, a move seen as opening the door for a market in new consolidation options for struggling company DB schemes.The regulatory regime is interim, bridging the period until such time as the government has legislated for a permanent framework, which it today said it was working towards.The pensions regulator (TPR) said it acted ahead of this to ensure clear rules were in place while DB superfunds and other new consolidation models emerged.Pensions minister Guy Opperman said: “The publication of today’s interim regime for DB superfunds is a big step towards a healthier and stronger pensions landscape.last_img read more

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JUST RELEASED: New Paper Says Puberty Blockers Aren’t the Answer to Gender Confusion

first_imgThe Daily Signal 20 June 2017Family First Comment: The bottom line for Hruz, Mayer, and McHugh is that “we frequently hear from neuroscientists that the adolescent brain is too immature to make reliably rational decisions, but we are supposed to expect emotionally troubled adolescents to make decisions about their gender identities and about serious medical treatments at the age of 12 or younger.” This new article in The New Atlantis should make all of us pause before embracing radical medical treatments for children.Exactly.Increasingly, gender therapists and physicians argue that children as young as nine should be given puberty-blocking drugs if they experience gender dysphoria.But a new article by three medical experts reveals that there is little scientific evidence to support such a radical procedure.The article, “Growing Pains: Problems with Puberty Suppression in Treating Gender Dysphoria,” published Tuesday in The New Atlantis, discusses over 50 peer-reviewed studies on gender dysphoria in children.It is co-authored by Dr. Paul W. Hruz, a professor at Washington University School of Medicine; Dr. Lawrence S. Mayer, a scholar in residence at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a professor at Arizona State University; and Dr. Paul R. McHugh, university distinguished service professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.Last year, Mayer and McHugh published an extensive report on sexuality and gender in general. Now, working with Hruz, an expert on pediatrics, they focus on children.As I explain in my forthcoming book, “When Harry Became Sally: Responding to the Transgender Moment,” the best biology, psychology, and philosophy all support an understanding of sex as a bodily reality, and of gender as a social manifestation of bodily sex.Biology isn’t bigotry, and we need a sober and honest assessment of the human costs of getting human nature wrong. This is especially true with children.And yet, pediatric gender clinics—and therapeutic interventions on children—are on the rise. In the past 10 years, dozens of pediatric gender clinics have sprung up throughout the United States.In 2007, Boston Children’s Hospital “became the first major program in the United States to focus on transgender children and adolescents,” as its own website brags.Seven years later, 33 gender clinics had opened their doors to our nation’s children, telling parents that puberty blockers and cross-sex hormones may be the only way to prevent teen suicides.Never mind that according to the best studies—the ones that even transgender activists themselves cite—80 to 95 percent of children with gender dysphoria will come to identify with and embrace their bodily sex.Never mind that 41 percent of people who identify as transgender will attempt suicide at some point in their lives, compared to 4.6 percent of the general population.Never mind that people who have had transition surgery are 19 times more likely than average to die by suicide.These statistics should stop us in our tracks. Clearly, we must work to find ways to effectively prevent these suicides and address the underlying causes. We certainly shouldn’t be encouraging children to “transition.”The sad reality is that while the number of pediatric gender clinics is growing, very little is known about gender identity in children—and many therapies amount to little more than experimentation on minors.Professional standards of care are being promulgated that state children should receive puberty-blocking drugs at as young as age 9, and cross-sex hormones at age 16—but there have been no controlled clinical trials on puberty blocking for gender dysphoria, and the Food and Drug Administration has not approved these drugs for treatment of gender dysphoria.Meanwhile, despite claims by advocates, there is no evidence that puberty blocking is “reversible,” nor that it is harmless. Most concerning of all is that these treatments run the risk that children may persist in their gender dysphoria.Blocking Puberty Could Cause Children to Persist in Gender DysphoriaIn their new article, Hruz, Mayer, and McHugh explain that transgender-affirming treatments of children “may drive some children to persist in identifying as transgender when they might otherwise have, as they grow older, found their gender to be aligned with their sex.”As the doctors note, “Gender identity for children is elastic (that is, it can change over time) and plastic (that is, it can be shaped by forces like parental approval and social conditions).”As a result, if “the increasing use of gender-affirming care does cause children to persist with their identification as the opposite sex, then many children who would otherwise not need ongoing medical treatment would be exposed to hormonal and surgical interventions.”Whereas 80 to 95 percent of children with gender dysphoria will come to identify with and embrace their biological sex, none of the children placed on puberty blockers in the Dutch clinic that pioneered this treatment came to identify with their biological sex. All of them persisted in their transgender identity.READ MORE: http://dailysignal.com/2017/06/20/new-paper-says-puberty-blockers-arent-answer-gender-confusion/READ THE FULL ARTICLE http://www.thenewatlantis.com/publications/growing-painsFAQ https://www.familyfirst.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/FAQs-New-Atlantis-on-puberty-suppression.pdfKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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Fed Cup: USA beat Latvia in doubles decider to reach finals

first_imgSofia Kenin and Bethanie Mattek-Sands defeated Jelena Ostapenko and Anastasija Sevastova 6-4, 6-0 in a deciding doubles as the USA survived a Saturday scare to beat unheralded Latvia 3-2 and reach the Fed Cup finals. Double delight: Sofia Kenin (left) and Bethanie Mattek-Sands celebrate taking the USA to the Fed Cup finals New Australian Open champion Kenin and Mattek-Sands ensured the USA reached the finals in Budapest from April 14-19 after both Serena Williams and Kenin had been stunned in the singles as Latvia levelled the qualifier 2-2 in Seattle. Sevastova had earlier inflicted a shock first Fed Cup singles loss on Williams 7-6 (7⁄5), 3-6, 7-6 (7⁄4). “We were playing in the USA so obviously the crowd was going to be for Serena. I just tried to give it my best,” Sevastova said of her win at the Angel of the Wings arena. Williams, the 23-time Grand Slam champion, bounced back from losing the first set by cruising through the second set in 33 minutes, but she was outplayed on the big points in the second tiebreak. Sevastova used her powerful serve to deliver aces at key moments, and a precision forehand ended Williams’ perfect streak at 14 wins after a 2hr 25min marathon. Williams’ loss to Sevastova comes just weeks after she was shocked by China’s world number 27 Wang Qiang in the last 32 of the Australian Open. – Kenin beaten – The former French Open champion Ostapenko had kept Latvia alive with a 6-3, 2-6, 6-2 upset against Kenin in just under two hours after the Americans went into the second day with a 2-0 lead. “Honestly it’s very special to play for my country and I was just trying my best,” said Ostapenko, who raced to a 3-0 lead against Kenin and broke her again in the eighth game on the way to winning the first set. Read Also: Fed Cup: Sevastova stuns Serena Williams to keep Latvia alive “I was fighting until the last point,” she said. “I knew it was going to be a very tough match and the key thing for me was just to play aggressive.” That approach may have contributed to her 49 unforced errors. Kenin made the most of them in the second set, fending off a break point in the first game then pulling away to take a 4-0 lead on the way to forcing a third set. In a third set that featured six breaks of serve, Ostapenko held for 3-1 and, finally, held in the last game, sealing it on her second match point. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 0 Promoted ContentBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeTop 10 Tiniest Phones Ever MadeWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterPlaying Games For Hours Can Do This To Your BodyThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More15 Celebs You Probably Didn’t Expect To Be Cheerleaders11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table TopMesmerizing Pictures Of World’s Most Beautiful Staircases6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The Universe9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A Tattoocenter_img Williams looked fatigued in her first Fed Cup singles match in four years. She had played doubles with sister Venus in her last tournament appearance in 2018. Loading… last_img read more

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Allen impressive in Caen

first_img Allen, 19, jumped three clears from five rounds aboard Molly Malone V during a long and testing competition that has run throughout most of the Games’ second week. Three Irish riders finished in the top 12, with Denis Lynch ninth aboard All Star 5 and Darragh Kenny filling 12th spot with Imothep. The top four finishers on Saturday will now contest Sunday’s final at Stade D’Ornano. Frenchman Patrice Delaveau (Orient Express HDC), American Beezie Madden (Cortes C), Swede Rolf Goran-Bengtsson (Casall Ask) and Holland’s Jeroen Dubbeldam (Zenith SFN) not only ride their own horses, but also each of their rivals’ before medal positions are decided. Irish showjumping prospect Bertram Allen served further notice of his talent by finishing seventh individually at the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games in Caen.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Trump: Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is correct about VA

first_imgPresident Trump took Twitter Wednesday to speak about popular Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in a different light.In the Tweet, he said Rep. Ocasio-Cortez is correct in her comments about the Veterans Department of Veterans Affairs but asserted that the program is only doing well because of the Trump Administrations efforts.Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is correct, the VA is not broken, it is doing great. But that is only because of the Trump Administration. We got Veterans Choice & Accountability passed. “President Trump deserves a lot of credit.” Dan Caldwell, Concerned Veterans of America— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 24, 2019 Rep. Ocasio-Cortez was pushing back against the privatization of the Department of Veterans Affairs’ health care system.She said at a town hall event last week privatizing the system would benefit pharmaceutical companies and health insurers, not veterans, telling constituents, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”Trump and Rep. Ocasio Cortez are known enemies with the young Democrat labeling him as a racist and recently calling for his impeachment and the president referring to her as a bartender in a recent Tweet about her ‘Green New Deal.’However, they seem to semi-agree for once.last_img read more

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Shafer explains Murphy earning top kicking spot against Notre Dame, says competition remains ongoing

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 30, 2014 at 2:01 pm Contact Jacob: jmklinge@syr.edu | @Jacob_Klinger_ Freshman walk-on Cole Murphy is No. 1 on Syracuse’s place-kicking depth chart for the first time. And on Tuesday’s teleconference, SU head coach Scott Shafer explained why.Murphy and Ryan Norton, who is 4-for-7 on the year, competed last week for the starting job. After having their attempts in practice charted, Shafer decided to start Murphy. He had an extra point blocked and a field goal bounce off the right upright, but Shafer said he kicked well and will continue to have Murpy and Norton compete for the starting kicking job.“And like all the players we’ll continue to watch him every day and I’m not steadfast on having to name a starter at any position at any time,” Shafer said. “Competition is what makes players excel at higher levels. So we’ll continue to create those competitive environments in practice.” Commentslast_img read more

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Ghana falls to Egypt in African U-20 final

first_imgThe young Pharoahs of Egypt have won the African U-20 youth championship beating the Satellites of Ghana 5-4 on penalties.The game ended 1-1 after regulation time with both goals coming through a penalty in the first ten minutes of the game.Egypt’s S Gomaa superbly converted a penalty to put the North Africans ahead in the fourth minute after his fellow attacker was brought down in the vital area by Nketiah.The Ghanaians quickly responded two minutes later with Arkoful drawing level through another penalty. An Egyptian defender in a desperate bid to clear his lines had his foot stuck in the face of Ordje giving the referee no option but to point to the spot for a penalty.In just seven minutes two goals had been scored, sending the signal it was going to be an electric night of football.Already the Ghanaians were on a mission of revenge having lost in the opening game to Egypt 2-1. And it did look like the mission was on course after the quick equaliser.Jeremiah Arkoful was unlucky when his well bent free-kick took a ricochet of the goal post with nobody to connect the rebound.Antwi came to the rescue of the Satellites with two brilliant saves in quick succession.He parried a goal bound flick from Bassam before saving another rebound to keep the Satellites in the game in the 40th minute.It was the Ghanaians who looked more determined to get the match winner in the second half. Arkoful again had a superbly taken free-kick whisk agonisingly wide before forcing a great finger tip save from the Egyptian goal keeper with his half volley.The Egyptians remained resolute and defended well and on few occasions probed for the match winner which proved elusive for both sides.After 120 minutes of near misses and great piece of defending and goal keeping by both teams the game had to be decided through penalty shootout.Egypt started woefully with a first miss but quickly recovered after Lawerh also missed his kick.Michael Anaba again missed his Ghana kick with the Egyptian player converting his last kick which won the Egyptians their fourt African U-20 glory.last_img read more

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